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*ANNOUNCEMENTS*
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*ANNOUNCEMENTS*


From April 2015 all announcements will be found at: http://www.whiteswritingwhiteness.ed.ac.uk/blog/
30/03/15post – Lives & Letters Mailing: March 2015
29/01/15post – Lives & Letters Mailing: New Olive Schreiner Letters Online goes live 5 February 2015!
08/01/15post – Lives & Letters Mailing: January 2015
24/10/14post – Lives & Letters Mailing: Whites Writing Whiteness Project Update October 2014
06/10/14post – Lives & Letters Mailing: October 2014
21/04/14post Lives & Letters Mailing: April 2014 - Whites Writing Whiteness project update
20/02/14post – Lives & Letters Mailing: February 2014
10/02/14post – Lives & Letters Mailing: February 2014 - Whites Writing Whiteness project update
26/01/14post – Vote for the best Olive Schreiner letter - closing date 31 March 2014
24/12/13post – Lives & Letters Mailing: December 2013
23/09/13post – Lives & Letters Mailing: September 2013
01/05/13post Lives & Letters Mailing: May 2013
14/03/13post – Lives & Letters Mailing: March 2013
11/02/13post Lives & Letters Mailing: February 2013
19/10/12post UPDATED! ESRC 3 year PhD Studentship, Edinburgh Sociology, Whites Writing Whiteness
12/06/12post – Lives & Letters Mailing: June 2012
26/03/12post – Lives & Letters Mailing: March 2012
21/01/12post – Olive Schreiner Letters Online - website launched!
20/12/11post Lives & Letters Mailing 1: December 2011
05/12/11post NABS Mailing: early December 2011
14/09/11post Olive Schreiner: Woman and Labour Centenary Special
01/07/11post – Advance information about the new 'Lives & Letters' Mailing List
09/06/11post Keynote address on Schreiner by Liz Stanley at 'Gender & the politics of auto/biographical memory:
   new directions' Conference, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, Program L'homme congress, 10 June 2011
25/03/11post – Conference Papers on aspects of Schreiner's Letters, 20 May 2011
22/02/11post – The Documents of Life Revisited! call for papers, NABS Seminar, Edinburgh, 20 May 2011
15/02/11post – Helen Dampier & Liz Stanley have been invited to participate in the international workshop on
  ‘Gender Histories Across Epistemologies’. Their paper is entitled ‘I just express my views & leave them   to work’: Using Olive Schreiner’s letters to re-think the historiography of Cape politics 1899-1910’.
28/09/10post – The Letters of Alice Greene, teacher, critic of the South African War, & letter-writer extraordinary
  (1858-1920) Two books of  interest to historians and sociologists (ed. John Barham)
21/07/10post – Olive Schreiner Letters Project - download publications!
28/04/10post – NABS/SCDS: Exploring Immigrant Personal Correspondence Workshop 14/05/10
26/01/10post – Edinburgh seminar on Migrant and Diaspora Narratives & Life Writings 26/03/10 
12/12/09post – OSLP Working Papers Launch
01/11/09post – Mellon Fellowship for Project PI

30/03/15post – Lives & Letters Mailing: March 2015

Dear Colleagues,

Welcome to a Lives & Letters mailing for early Spring 2015.

This mailing contains information about:

1. Whites Writing Whiteness project news – March 2015
2. Olive Schreiner Letters Online news – March 2015
3. Mosaic: a journal for the interdisciplinary study of literature. CFP on Letters
4. Oral History Spring School 2015
5. Life Writing, volume 12, number 1, now available!
6. Women, Narrative and Crime Interdisciplinary Conference

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1. Whites Writing Whiteness project news – March 2015

We are pleased to announce a number of recent additions to the Whites Writing Whiteness project website:

·         Liz Stanley’s article ‘Is the letter now dead?’ is now available via OnlineFirst on the Cultural Sociology journal website: http://cus.sagepub.com/content/early/recent. More information about the article is available here:   http://www.whiteswritingwhiteness.ed.ac.uk/blog/is-the-letter-now-dead/ 
 

·         Details of the Whites Writing Whiteness project’s foundational or ‘First Principles’ are summarised and now available: http://www.whiteswritingwhiteness.ed.ac.uk/project-overview/first-principles/
 

·         Our ‘Cabinet of Curiosities’ hosts a new post concerning the character of ‘a copy’ and other drafted, non-final versions of letters in the archive: http://www.whiteswritingwhiteness.ed.ac.uk/cabinet-of-curiosities/a-copy/ 
 

·         The project Blog now contains a series of posts written while on archival fieldwork in South Africa. The most recent, ‘Puzzles, Problems & Possibilities: Archival Fieldwork (Jan – March 2015)’, is a set of 10 weekly posts covering a wide range of archival issues, dilemmas and discoveries, available at:  http://www.whiteswritingwhiteness.ed.ac.uk/blog/puzzles-jan-march-2015/. A large set of posts from an earlier fieldwork trip, concerning ‘Doing Archival Research: Pointers from the Cory Fieldtrip (July and August 2014)’, is also available: http://www.whiteswritingwhiteness.ed.ac.uk/blog/cory/

With best wishes
Liz Stanley and Andrea Salter
 

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2. Olive Schreiner Letters Online news – March 2015

 

The Olive Schreiner Letters Online website http://www.oliveschreiner.org/, home to nearly 5000 transcriptions of the feminist, social theorist and socialist writer Olive Schreiner’s letters, underwent a huge revamp in February 2015. We have now made additional tweaks and are delighted with the results: we’d love to hear your thoughts!

In addition to a new and improved user interface, the Olive Schreiner Letters Online now contains:

·         Seven sets of **brand new letters** written by Schreiner which have come to light since the March 2012 launch of the Schreiner Letters Online: http://www.oliveschreiner.org/vre?page=319   

·         All of the versions of letters Olive Schreiner’s estranged husband Cronwright-Schreiner was involved in editing and producing are now separated out into a new collection, ‘SCCS Edited Extracts’. This is because his versions are different in kind from the letters that Schreiner herself wrote and form a rather different kind of ‘data’: http://www.oliveschreiner.org/vre?view=collections&archiveid=27&arrangeby=colorder. Regarding Cronwright-Schreiner’s editing practices, readers might be interested in: Stanley, Liz & Salter, Andrea (2009) "'Her letters cut are generally nothing of interest': The heterotopic persona of Olive Schreiner and the alterity-persona of Cronwright-Schreiner” English in Africa 36, 2: 7-30.

·         A complete list of 'Project Publications' is now also available on OSLO, many of which are downloadable. Please see: http://www.oliveschreiner.org/vre?page=297

With best wishes
Liz Stanley and Andrea Salter

 
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3. Mosaic: a journal for the interdisciplinary study of literature. CFP on Letters

 
Call for Submissions: Letters

 

Mosaic invites innovative and interdisciplinary submissions for a special issue on the theme of philosophy’s, literature’s, or any other discipline’s, letters. Traditionally, letters have been regarded as “non-serious” or at least as superfluous to the critical enterprise proper (consider Kant’s division of Plato the letter-writer from Plato the philosophical father). But can letters themselves be considered critical forays and/or keys to the inheritance of scholarly work? Might letters put the serious/non-serious opposition into question? For this special issue, Mosaic encourages submissions that bring letters to light in relation but not limited to the following themes: understanding a writer’s or artist’s body of work; alternate histories; friendship; auto-bio-graphy; archival and digital repository research; email, and electronic posting.

 

Mosaic follows an electronic submission process. If you would like to contribute an essay for review, please visit our website for details: www.umanitoba.ca/mosaic/submit. Email any submission questions to mosasub@umanitoba.ca. Submissions must be received by: October 16, 2015.

 

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES: We welcome submissions that conform to our mandate.

·         Essays may be in English or French and must represent innovative thought (either in the form of extending or challenging current critical positions). Mosaic does not publish fiction, poetry, or book reviews.

·         Mosaic publishes only original work. We will not consider essays that are part of a thesis or dissertation, have been published previously, or are being considered for publication in another journal or medium.

·         Preferred length of essays is 7,000 words, to a maximum of 7,500 words. Parenthetical citations and works cited must follow the conventions of the MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing (3rd ed.)  or MLA Handbook (7th ed.). Essays may feature illustrations. 

·         Mosaic’s anonymous peer-review process requires that no identifying information appear on the electronic version of the essay itself. Submissions that meet our requirements are sent to specialists in the specific and general area that an essay addresses. Anonymous but complete transcripts of the readers’ reports are sent to the author. 

Address inquiries by email to:

Dr. Dawne McCance
Mosaic, a journal for the interdisciplinary study of literature
University of Manitoba, 208 Tier Building
Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 2N2 Canada
Tel: 204-474-8597, Fax: 204-474-7584
Email:
mosasub@umanitoba.ca

Submissions: Submit online at www.umanitoba.ca/mosaic/submit

 

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 4. Oral History Spring School 2015

 

Institute for Historical Research, Senate House, London, WC1E 7HU

Starts on: 16th April 2015, Finishes on: 18th April 2015

 

The Institute for Historical Research and the Oral History Society will be staging the fourth Oral History Spring School between 16 and 18 April 2015 at Senate House, London.

The Oral History Spring School covers the theory and practice of oral history in depth, with the help of leading UK oral historians. To be able to take advantage of the course students should have some prior experience in recording and writing oral history and will be asked to complete readings in advance, available through a dedicated online website.

 

Through lectures and discussion and practical examples from oral history research the three day course will:

 

• Consider the emergence and development of oral history, and the links between theory and practice when considering memory of the past

• Compare different approaches which oral historians have used to understand and analyse their interviews

• Reflect on emotion as a part of oral history and the inter-subjective relationship of the interview when reflection on past experience may lead to displays of emotion

• Review the rewards gained from returning to archived oral history data as well as the challenges which re-use generated

• Provide an opportunity to explore challenges and questions posed by individual research interests through group discussion

• Discuss the use of oral history in a range of contexts from academic monographs to museum exhibitions and community projects

 

The three day course will also include a visit to the Museum of London where students will have an opportunity to view and discuss oral history in a museum setting with a member of the curatorial staff.

 

For more information and booking details please go to the link below.

 

Course tutor(s):

Professor Joanna Bornat
Professor Jenny Harding
Dr Joel Morley
Professor Paul Thompson
Dr Shelley Trowser

Register online at: http://store.london.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=5&deptid=178&catid=20&prodid=296
Fee: £225

 

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5. Life Writing, volume 12, number 1, is now available!

 

ARTICLES

‘Write Your Life!’ British Prisoners of War in the Korean War (1950–1953) and Enforced Life Narratives
Grace Huxford

 

Encountering language difference in Australian memoirs of living in France
Juliana de Nooy

 

Against Autobiography: Henri Matisse's Essays on Art
Kathryn Brown

 

Writing Exile: Displacement and Arrival in Eva Hoffman's Lost in Translation and Edward Said's Out of Place
Sarah Jilani

 

Farewell to the Self: Between the Letter and the Self-Portrait
Maria Tamboukou

 

REFLECTIONS

Dialogues with shadows: reflections on identity, history and travel
Ryota Nishino

 

REVIEWS

Ann Jurecic, Illness as Narrative.
Reviewed by Antje Lindemeyer

 

Saskia Beudel, A Country in Mind: Memoir with Landscape.
Reviewed by Elisabeth Hanscombe

 
Editor:
Associate Professor Maureen Perkins
Macquarie University


website:
http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rlwr20/current

 

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6. Women, Narrative and Crime Interdisciplinary Conference

 

Teesside University (Darlington Campus)
9th July 2015

 

Keynote Speakers: Deborah Jermyn (Roehampton) & Lizzie Seal (Sussex)

 

From Pat Barker’s novel Blow Your House Down (1984) to Alan Moore and Eddie Campbell’s graphic novel From Hell (1999) and Alecky Blythe and Adam Cork’s stage musical London Road (2011), artists, writers and film-makers have explored the collective memory and cultural meaning of crimes against women, both past and present. This interdisciplinary conference will bring to together researchers and practitioners from the arts, humanities and socials sciences to explore questions of narrative and crime in relation to violence against women, as well as addressing themes relating to women, crime and justice more broadly.

 

This conference will critically explore the growing recognition within the social sciences of ‘popular’ criminological texts (Rafter, 2007) - such as film, TV drama, crime fiction, true-crime - as valid social documents, which shape both public and academic understandings of crime, justice and victimization, and offer alternative means of engaging with criminal events and ‘knowing’ about crime. This conference aims to explore how these ‘differing spheres of representation’ (Brown, 2003) deal with violence against women, reflecting on the relationship between academic and cultural texts (Wakeman, 2011), and the privileging of particular texts as a means of conveying feminist messages relating to misogyny, violence and victimhood.


We welcome abstracts (250 words) for 20 minute papers from researchers and practitioners working in the following fields: criminology; sociology; English; film and media studies; theatre and performance studies; the visual arts; women’s, gender, queer and transgender studies.

 

Themes for papers may include but are not limited to:


 Feminism, violence against women and social media
Visual criminology
Crime, place and myth
True crime
Narrative criminology
Fiction, film, television drama, graphic novels, computer games, visual arts, performing arts
The politics and ethics of fictional reconstruction
Violence, intersectionality and difference
Genres of crime narrative – detective / crime fiction, historical fiction, documentary, creative non-fiction

 

This event is part of a British Academy funded project at Teesside University; the project explored the significance of the Yorkshire Ripper murders for those living closest to them and highlights how a range of narratives offered by the social sciences, true crime and crime fiction represent themes of misogyny, violence against women and fear of crime.

Abstracts (250 words) and brief author profiles should be submitted to wnccon@tees.ac.uk<mailto:wnccon@tees.ac.uk> by 15th April 2015.

 

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With apologies for cross-posting.

 

Best wishes,

Andrea




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29/01/15post – Lives & Letters Mailing: New Olive Schreiner Letters Online goes live 5 February 2015!

Dear Colleagues

We are pleased to announce that a new Olive Schreiner Letters Online goes live on 5 February 2015.

The Humanities Research Institute at the University of Sheffield has confirmed that technical work will be completed for the launch of the ‘new look’ Olive Schreiner Letters Online by the end of 5 February. The Virtual Research Environment (VRE) supporting this will also underpin publication in due course of the Whites Writing Whiteness project.

Please do take a look and let us know your thoughts.

Best wishes,

Liz Stanley and Andrea Salter


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08/01/15post – Lives & Letters Mailing: January 2015

Dear Colleagues

 A Happy New Year and welcome to another Lives & Letters Mailing...

 

This mailing contains information about the following:

 
 
1. New-look Olive Schreiner Letters Online! 

2. Whites Writing Whiteness project: January to March 2015 South Africa Fieldtrip Blog!

3. Centre for Research in Memory, Narrative and Histories, University of Brighton - Seminars 2015
 
4. Free access to most recent issue of a/b: Auto/Biography Studies (29.1)

5. Centre for Narrative Research, Research Seminars 2015 - University of East London, Docklands, East Building

6. Gender History Network (Edinburgh) Seminars 2015

 

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1. New-look Olive Schreiner Letters Online!

A revamp of the entire OSLO webpages has now been completed together with a new design and will be published later in January. This is important for Whites Writing Whiteness as it shares much of the behind the scenes software technology, and means its VRE has been stepped‎ up a notch. More on the WWW VRE at a later stage.

 

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2. Whites Writing Whiteness project: January to March 2015 South Africa Fieldtrip Blog!

Archives in Kimberley, Cape Town, Grahamstown (Cory), Bloemfontein and Pretoria are being visited to continue the work of populating the WWW database of family and other collections. A weekly blog post will report on progress – please watch this space for detail.

 

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3. Centre for Research in Memory, Narrative and Histories, University of Brighton - Seminars 2015

All seminars meet from 5.00 for drinks, with papers and discussion from 5.30-7.00

·         Wednesday 14 January 2015, G4, Grand Parade:
Dr Celia Hughes, University of Copenhagen: ‘Love, Sex and Selfhood: Narrating the Young Sixties Man'.

·         Wednesday 18 February 2015, G4, Grand Parade:
Dr Olu Jenzen, University of Brighton: 'LGBTQ Digital Activism, Subjectivity and Neoliberalism'.

·         Wednesday 18 March 2015, G4, Grand Parade:
Dr Fia Sundevall, Stockholm University and Visiting Scholar, University of Brighton: 'Surveying sex: gender and sexuality in former conscripts’ memories of military service'.

No need to book. Just turn up on the day. For further information email Sam Carroll:
memoryhistorynarratives@brighton.ac.uk
<mailto:memoryhistorynarratives@brighton.ac.uk>
or visit http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/mnh

 

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4. Free access to most recent issue of a/b: Auto/Biography Studies (29.1)

The editors of a/b: Auto/Biography Studies are pleased to offer free access to our most recent issue, 29.1. This is the illustrated special issue, Framing Lives, guest edited by Paul Arthur. Please visit our Routledge website to access the issue: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/raut20/current#.VKaxpXt0fYg.


Have a Happy New Year!

--

Ricia Anne Chansky, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez
Co-Editor, a/b: Auto/Biography Studies
www.tandfonline.com/raut

 

 

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5. Centre for Narrative Research, Research Seminars 2015 - University of East London, Docklands, East Building

Tuesdays, 1:00 - 2:00 pm, room

EB.1.63 (2014) and EB.1.45 (2015)

February 9, 2015 Laura Mitchison and Rosa Vilbr, On the Record

Fellowship of Controversy – Narratives of Speakers’ Corner in Hyde Park

March 9, 2015 Couze Venn and Francesca Ashurst, Goldsmiths, University of London/Cardiff University

Genealogy, the archive and the counter-history of exclusion

April 20, 2015 Eric Woods, University of East London

Rethinking the Rise of Redress in the 20th Century West: Accounting for the ‘Perpetrators’

 

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6. Gender History Network (Edinburgh) Seminars 2015

 

Gender History Network (Edinburgh)

Seminar Programme

Semester 2, 2014-15

 
Wednesday 14 January 2015, 5.00-6.30pm
With Scottish History Seminar
Katie Barclay (University of Adelaide / IASH, University of Edinburgh)
‘Emotions and the Scottish Family in the eighteenth century’
Location: Room G.13, William Robertson Wing (University of Edinburgh), Teviot Place, Doorway 4.

 
Tuesday 20 January 2015, 5.15-6.30pm
With Centre for Renaissance and Medieval Studies
Cordelia Beattie (University of Edinburgh)
Did Married Women Make Wills in Fifteenth-century England?
Location: Meadows Lecture Theatre, William Robertson Wing (University of Edinburgh), Teviot Place, Doorway 4.

 
Wednesday 28 January 2015, 5.00-6.30pm
Clare Tebbutt (University of Manchester)
'The "Man-Woman Problem": Sex Changing in 1930s Britain'
Location: Room G.13, William Robertson Wing (University of Edinburgh), Teviot Place, Doorway 4.

 
Wednesday 4 February 2015, 6.00-7.30pm
With Gender and Politics Research Group, School of Social and Political Science, University of Edinburgh
‘Women’s Movements in Scotland: From Enfranchisement to the Referendum’
Speakers include: Cat Boyd, Sarah Browne and Valerie Wright. Short presentations by speakers will be followed by a panel discussion.
Location and further details to be confirmed.

 
Wednesday 18 February 2015, 5.00-6.30pm
With the Centre for Renaissance and Medieval Studies
Pat Cullum (University of Huddersfield)
'Beastly bishops? Satire and the unmanning of the late medieval clergy'
Location: Room G.13, William Robertson Wing (University of Edinburgh), Teviot Place, Doorway 4.

 
Wednesday 4 March 2015, 5.00-6.30pm
Margaretta Jolly (University of Sussex)
‘The Sound of Feminist Memory’
Location: Room G.14, William Robertson Wing (University of Edinburgh), Teviot Place, Doorway 4.

 
Wednesday 11 March 2015, 5.00-6.30pm
Gender and Archaeology seminar
Joanna Sofaer (University of Southampton)
‘Cartographies of the Body in the Archaeology of Gender’
Location: Room G.16, William Robertson Wing (University of Edinburgh), Teviot Place, Doorway 4.
  
Wednesday 6 May 2015, 5.00-6.30pm
‘Work in Progress’ seminar, on health, sexuality and the body
Two speakers:
Jane O’Neill (University of Edinburgh)
"But we would never have asked!": Learning about sex in Scotland, 1945-80.
 Jackie Gulland (University of Edinburgh)
“A considerable capacity for housework”:  gender, disability and the construction of (in)capacity for work across the 20 century
Location: Meadows Lecture Theatre, William Robertson Wing (University of Edinburgh), Teviot Place, Doorway 4.

 
The seminar organizers are Esther Breitenbach, Louise Jackson, Iida Saarinen and Alva Traebert.

For further information about the Gender History Network (Edinburgh) see:
http://www.shca.ed.ac.uk/Research/networks/gender_history/ or https://www.facebook.com/GenderHistoryNetwork

For campus maps and directions see:
http://www.ed.ac.uk/maps

 


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24/10/14post – Lives & Letters Mailing: Whites Writing Whiteness Project Update October 2014

Dear Colleagues

Welcome to another Lives & Letters Mailing…

We have just added the following set of brand new pages to the Whites Writing Whiteness project website:

Firstly, we have put together a new reading list on ‘Missions, Missionaries and South Africa’:
http://www.whiteswritingwhiteness.ed.ac.uk/readallabout/missions-missionaries-and-south-africa/ We would love to hear from any readers with views on what the next reading list should concern. Please do get in touch.

Secondly, we have posted a new item in our Cabinet of Curiosities. It discusses the question ‘A place for everything and everything in its place?’ around letters’ spatial and temporal aspects, particularly regarding the epistolary ‘between’ of the letters Elizabeth Price and David Livingstone wrote:
http://www.whiteswritingwhiteness.ed.ac.uk/cabinet-of-curiosities/a-place-for-everything/

Thirdly and finally, there is updated information about a number of project publications, including two journal articles submitted for publication:
•       ‘The death of the letter? Letterness and the many ends of letter-writing’:
http://www.whiteswritingwhiteness.ed.ac.uk/action-research/the-death-of-the-letter-letterness-and-the-many-ends-of-letter-writing/ 
•       ‘Operationalizing a QLR on social change and whiteness in South African 1770s – 1970s.’ Figures and Extras such as a Powerpoint presentation relating to this research are available from our ‘Action: Research’ pages:
http://www.whiteswritingwhiteness.ed.ac.uk/action-research/

As ever, if you have any comments about items which appear (or which you think should appear!) on the Whites Writing Whiteness project website, please do get in touch with us directly or leave a comment. Many thanks.

With best wishes,
Liz Stanley and Andrea Salter


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06/10/14post
– Lives & Letters Mailing: October 2014
 
Dear Colleagues
 
Welcome to a Lives & Letters Mailing for October 2014!
 
This mailing contains information about:
 
1. Register for ‘Failure in the Archives!’ Centre for Editing Lives and Letters
2. Introducing the Mass Observation Project (1981-2014) as a data source for researchers
3. ESREA Life History and Biography Network - Annual Conference 2015, First Call for Papers
4. CFP: Ethics of Storytelling University of Turku (4-6 June 2015)
5. New from Routledge! Constructing Narratives of Continuity and Change: a transdisciplinary approach to researching lives
6. New! Journal of Narrative Politics
7. CNR-NOVELLA graduate research seminars, 2014-15
8. IASH, University of Edinburgh, research seminars Autumn 2014
 
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1. Register for ‘Failure in the Archives!’ Centre for Editing Lives and Letters
 
Registration is now open for the Centre for Editing Lives and Letters’ conference on 30 October 2014, Failure in the Archives, featuring a keynote address by Natalie Zemon Davis.
 
http://www.livesandletters.ac.uk/news/2014/08/register-failure-archives
 
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2. Introducing the Mass Observation Project (1981-2014) as a data source for researchers
 
We invite you to attend an interactive day-event for researchers and doctoral students.
 
This event will introduce you to the unique resources of the Mass Observation Project (MOP). It provides the chance to discuss and try-out the opportunities that the MOP presents for qualitative longitudinal and/or mixed-method research.
 
The MOP is a self-selecting citizen's writing project where individual writers have been answering sets of themed questions/directives on a range of different issues, themes and events between 1981 and present day (http://www.massobs.org.uk/index.htm).
 
At this event you will:
  • Go on a tour of the archive and its resources with staff at the archive.
  • Be ‘introduced’ to MOP writers and the topics they write about.
  • Discuss a case-study example of a longitudinal mixed-methods project at the University of Southampton, which is using MOP writing in combination with the British Household Panel Survey and the British Social Attitudes Survey.
  • Take part in a hands-on workshop where you can examine and analyse the scripts of individual writers across time.

This event would be suitable for any researcher - including post-graduate/doctoral researchers from a range of different disciplines (social sciences, humanities, and different science and STEM disciplines) who are considering using qualitative and/or mixed research methods.
 
The event takes place on Monday 27th October at The Keep in Brighton (http://www.thekeep.info/) - 10am to 4.30 pm. (please arrive for registration before 10)
 
The Keep is a fully accessible venue. If you require further information on accessibility, please contact moa@sussex.ac.uk<mailto:moa@sussex.ac.uk>
 
Refreshments and lunch will be provided.
 
There is a £16 fee to cover the costs of this event. Please book by visiting: http://go.soton.ac.uk/61a
The maximum number of participants for this event is 20. Booking for this event will close at midnight on 20th October, or when we have reached our maximum number of participants.
 
For enquiries about this event please contact Rose Lindsey tel: 02380 594442 or email: R.Lindsey@soton.ac.uk<mailto:R.Lindsey@soton.ac.uk>
 
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3. ESREA Life History and Biography Network - Annual Conference 2015, First Call for Papers
 
ESREA – European Society for Research on the Education of Adults
Life History and Biography Network
 
Stories that make a difference. Can telling, listening to and interpreting stories make any real difference in a troubled and troubling world? If so, where, when and how? Life-based and art-based research: exploring their collective, social and political potential
 
The Annual Conference in 2015 will be held in Italy at Università di Milano Bicocca From Thursday 5th to Sunday 8th March 2015 - First Call for Papers
 
The Network
After its first meeting in Geneva, in 1993, the Life History and Biography Network of ESREA has been a forum for a wide range of researchers, including doctoral students, drawing on different disciplinary backgrounds, and coming from every corner of Europe, and beyond. Life history and biographical approaches in adult education and lifelong learning are very diverse, and our conferences are based on recognition and celebration of this diversity; we have sought to create spaces for dialogue, demonstration, reflexivity and discovery. In 21 years, the Network has provided the basis for diverse and influential publications, as well as for major collaborative research projects and many other forms of collaboration.
 
Our last conferences have explored areas of research and practice in life history and auto/biography: such as the role of wisdom, of the emotions, of the embodied nature of learning and narratives, of the meaning of words, of interdisciplinary research, and of the dynamic of agency and structure as well as structuration processes (see ESREA’s website and the Introductory Chapter of Embodied Narratives. Connecting stories, bodies, cultures and ecologies, edited by Laura Formenti, Linden West and Marianne Horsdal. University of Southern Denmark, www.universitypress.dk ISBN: 978-87-76747473)
 
The conference theme
During the last conference, in Magdeburg, 2014, two different topics emerged as interesting themes for life history and auto/biographical research: of the political role and potential of our work as well as the role of the arts, of literature, of poetry and music in helping us think about a troubled world. We decided to combine these and to address them in our 2015 network conference. Hence, we invite researchers and diverse scholars to join us by submitting proposals for papers and workshops to explore the theme of whether life-based narrative and artistic activity can invigorate collective political and social action, in such a troubled world.
 
Of course, social and political engagement can be an aspect of adult life, and of our lives as scholars, as well as a relevant issue for adult education and research. It seems particularly important in the present moment of rising levels of xenophobia, racism and fundamentalism. During the Magdeburg conference, some of us began new conversations about the biographical origins of our own social feelings and political inclinations: of being active and/or attentive to the social and political life of the planet, of our country/ies, institutions, and/or groups. This might link to experience, especially during adolescence and youth. Recounting our own experiences brought reflections on the actual and possible role of research – namely life-based research – in illuminating processes of conscientization, of building critical reflexivity, alongside active participation, community learning, and so on. This in a ‘liquid’, fragile, dangerous world where the role and nature of politics is itself uncertain, democracy marginalized, and the power of neo-liberal assumptions transcendent, if deeply flawed.
 
The second topic had to do with the power of arts, and all kinds of media, including new social media, in creating strong emotions, authentic participation, and spaces for reflection. The relationship among different media, and with spoken or written language, seems to be a very promising field for the development of life-based methods of research, and more generally for qualitative inquiry. Stories are not only made of words, as some of our conferences have already thematized (Milano 2009, Vaxjo 2010, Odense 2012, Magdeburg 2014).
 
Life-histories and auto/biographies seem not only able to connect science, arts, and politics, but to become occasions for innovation, for transformative learning, for community and political action in diverse settings. Telling new stories can be deeply agentic and political in nature. In these terms they go far beyond “pure research” - or a detached view of academic research in its ivory tower - to build new qualities of space for social and individual action and change. This is not always the case, of course: we want to investigate the conditions in which stories can “make a real difference” - for whom and for what and on whose terms?
 
The conference seeks to develop a sense of interconnectivity among life-based and arts-based narrative research, around the potential for individual but also collective transformations that might be triggered or chronicled by research. It will also be attentive to weaving into our work previous themes of our conferences: embodiment and narrative, critical reflection, social change, agency. One goal of this conference is to encourage all participants to reflect on their research and to ask themselves how they can integrate socio-political change and community engagement, alongside an interest in the human subject and the nature of learning and education, at a more intimate and individual level. Perhaps political engagement, if it is to make real difference, requires personal reflexivity and biographical awareness, if the mistakes and even tragedies of the past are to be avoided. The personal is political, and the political, perhaps, deeply personal.
 
Some questions
Can narration – in its many forms - help young or older adults to become more effective leaders in community development and political action?
 
Can life-based research enhance the dialogue between generations and produce new forms of conversation as well as action?
 
How could narrative research foster human commitment to cooperative action and inquiry, and to social as well as political learning? What is the role of narration in developing a New Civics?
 
Our Scientific Committee
Laura Formenti, Linden West (conveners of the Network)
Michel Alhadeff-Jones, Jean-Michel Baudouin, Agnieszka Bron, Francesco Cappa, Bettina Dausien, Rob Evans, Barbara Merrill, José Gonzalez Monteagudo, Małgosia Malec-Rawiński
 
The components of the Scientific Committee come from Austria, Italy, Germany, Poland, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom. All of us have been active in the Network and in ESREA for some time, and we are committed to create a learning community and to offer good critical space for younger and older researchers.
 
The location of the Conference
The conference will be held at Villa Forno, an historical building situated in Cinisello Balsamo, via Martinelli 15, in the northern outskirts of Milano. Built in the XVIII century and recently restored, the building is part of the campus of Milano Bicocca University and is used at present for graduate courses and teachers' education, meetings and concerts. Cinisello Balsamo offers many possibilities for accommodation at different prices.
 
Deadline for submission of abstracts for papers and proposals for symposia/workshops: 31st October 2014
 
Please send your proposals to: LHBN2015@unimib.it
 
Abstracts (WORD format) should have no more than 500 words, Times New Roman, 12 points. The title of the abstract should be clear. Your name, institutional affiliation, phone and email should NOT be included in the abstract, but be on a separate page.
 
Proposals will be blind reviewed; acceptance will be announced by 30th November 2014 
 
Final papers (3000 – 5000 words) should be submitted by 31st January 2015
 
Detailed Guidelines for submission, as well as the programme of the Conference will be made available in the website of the Department of Human Sciences for Education: http://www.formazione.unimib.it/
 
Conference languages are English and French
 
ESREA's language policy is inclusive. Abstracts for the peer-review process must be in English or French. Papers and presentations in the conference will be welcome in French as well as English. Where possible, anyway, a short (1000-1500 word) summary in English should be provided.
 
For French, German, Italian speakers (and for all others): slides in English or bilingual are recommended.
 
English speakers are asked, too, where possible, to provide bilingual versions of their slides.
 
We will not have professional translation during the conference, since we prefer to use the linguistic skills and good will of some of us to facilitate dialogue. Tolerance, respect, mutual support and curiosity will do the rest.
 
It is important to recognize that speakers requiring some element of translation or explanation must accept that they can say less in the allotted time: they should plan for this, perhaps by providing essential information in the form of a hand-out, for example.
 
For further information, please write to:
 
Professor Laura Formenti: laura.formenti@unimib.it; or Professor Linden West: linden.west@canterbury.ac.uk
 
Professor Linden West PhD FRSA
Director of the MPhil/PhD programme
Faculty of Education
Canterbury Christ Church University
North Holmes Road
Canterbury, Kent CT1 1QU, United Kingdom
Phone 044 (0)1227 782732
email address linden.west@canterbury.ac.uk
 
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4. CFP: Ethics of Storytelling University of Turku (4-6 June 2015)
 
Ethics of Storytelling: Historical Imagination in Contemporary Literature, Media and Visual Arts
 
University of Turku (Finland), 4–6 June 2015
 
What strategies do contemporary arts (such as literature, film, visual, media and performative arts) employ to narrate experiences that resist telling and imagining, such as experiences of traumatic histories and limit events? What ethical issues do their processes of storytelling involve?
 
The international conference Ethics of Storytelling: Historical Imagination in Contemporary Literature, Media and Visual Arts invites scholars to address the ethical dimension of storytelling and its intertwinement with the historicity of experience. It investigates how different modalities of storytelling enable diverse ways of coming to terms with traumatic historical experiences, including war and political conflicts,  and the intersecting histories of violence linked to colonialism and migration. The conference explores ethics of storytelling particularly in relation to the ways in which the contemporary arts work with historical imagination and the realm of the possible, from the perspective of subjects of experience and of cultural processes of meaning-formation.
 
While much of poststructuralist and postmodern theorization endorsed an aesthetics of the ineffable which regarded narrative as a violent form of appropriation, the recent years have seen a surge of interest in the ethical potential of storytelling. For example, the work of thinkers like Jan and Aleida Assmann, Paul Ricoeur and Dominick LaCapra has shown the relevance of narrative for cultural memory and for working through cultural trauma; Adriana Cavarero has explored the desire for one’s story in relation to an ontology of relationality and vulnerability; and the recent work of Michael Rothberg and Max Silverman foregrounds the multidirectional and palimpsestic character of memory: the ways in which fictional narratives produce new insights by bringing together different times and places into new constellations of similarities and differences.
 
In relation to these recent debates, the conference endeavours to shift the emphasis of the discussion on the ethics of representation to the ethics of storytelling as a form of imagination. How do different artistic practices of storytelling contribute to cultural memory by creating new constellations of the past, present and future? What ethical potential does storytelling have as a process of imagining the past that opens up new possibilities of experience, action and thought? We invite scholars across disciplines and cultural contexts into a conversation that highlights the potential of storytelling to unsettle dominant historical narratives by mobilizing the imagination of alternative realities, possibilities, courses of action and orientations towards the future. The conversation takes place in the increasingly global context of artistic production and reception, where the relationship between subjects of experience, cultural memory and ethics of storytelling is evermore timely.
 
 The possible topics include but are not limited to:
·         the contribution of arts to cultural memory and historical imagination
·         narrative and memory as multidirectional/palimpsestic
·         the ethical and violent potential of storytelling
·         narrative imagination in relation to history, politics, the everyday and the literary/artistic
·         ontology of vulnerability as a basis for rethinking violence
·         artworks as constellations of intersecting histories of violence
·         the crisis and return of storytelling
·         different forms of narrative and issues of power
·         the arts as forms of alternative historiography
·         ethics of storytelling in relation to narrative studies, trauma studies and Holocaust studies, their interrelations
·         the dialogical, relational aspects of storytelling
·         art and the dimension of the possible
·         forging the past and future in the present, issues of futurity
·         the presence of the past (such as the experience of war) in the present
·         affectivity, embodied experience and storytelling
·         changing conditions of production and reception of stories in the globalized world
·         how do the arts probe, explore and develop alternative modes of storytelling as ways of working through historical traumas
·         arts as inquiry and arts studies as a form of imagination
 
Confirmed keynote speakers:
·         Aleida Assmann (Universität Konstanz)
·         Michael Rothberg (University of Illinois)
·         Leslie A. Adelson (Cornell University)
·         Anna Reading (King’s College London)
·         Ernst Van Alphen (Leiden University)
·         Molly Andrews (University of East London)
 
Proposals for individual papers or panels:
 
Please provide the title and the abstract (max. 300 words) of the paper you are proposing yourname, institutional affiliation, and email address; and a brief statement (max. 100 words) about your work and your publications. If you are proposing a panel, also include a brief statement of the panel’s objectives.
 
Please send the proposals (PDF or Word) to the conference secretary Kaisa Kaakinen, <ethicsofstorytelling@gmail.com> by 15 November 2014.
 
Organizers
The conference is organized by the research project “Ethics of Storytelling and the Experience of History in Contemporary Arts” (Emil Aaltonen Foundation, 2013–15, project leader: Hanna Meretoja),
 
http://ethicsofstorytelling.wordpress.com/ in collaboration with:
·                     Comparative Literature, University of Turku
·                     Cultural History, University of Turku
·                     Media Studies, University of Turku
·                     School of History, Culture and Arts Studies, University of Turku
·                     Narrare: Centre for Interdisciplinary Narrative Studies
 
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5. New from Routledge! Constructing Narratives of Continuity and Change: a transdisciplinary approach to researching lives
 
Constructing Narratives of Continuity and Change: a transdisciplinary approach to researching lives.
Edited by Hazel Reid, Canterbury Christ Church University,  UK and Linden West, Canterbury Christ Church University, UK
Series: Routledge Research in Education
 
In this volume, academics and researchers from across disciplines including education, psychology and health studies come together to discuss personal, political and professional narratives of struggle, resilience and hope.
 
Contributors draw from a rich body of auto/biographical research examining the role of narrative and how it can be constructed, considering the roles of significant others, inspirational, educational and fictional characters, as well as myth and legend, to compose a life story. Reference is made to the evolving role of narrative in studies of educational process, in health and other forms of professional practice, and in psychotherapy.
 
Contents
Narratives of change and continuity: their transdisciplinary and subversive potential
Linden West and Hazel Reid
 
Auto/biography: a relational journey
Laura Formenti
 
Moments of Being’ and the search for meaning: epistemological and methodological challenges for the autoethnographic researcher
Wilma Fraser
 
‘A very elementary transformation of one’s existence’ Narrating moments of political change
Molly Andrews
 
Learning democracy and fundamentalism: narratives of change, recognition and disrespect
Linden West
 
Whose story? Whose memory? Multiple readings of oral-history life accounts from the socialist era
Martin Hájek
 
Identity formation and re-formation within Christian Fundamentalism: Journeys of Faith – interrupted.
Josie McSkimming
 
Stories of resistance and resilience; journeys to engagement with the UK Global Justice Movement
James Trewby
 
Family beliefs and practices around academic ability and social mobility; narratives of contradiction, continuity, and resistance
Laura Mazzoli Smith
 
How do career guidance practitioners talk about their class, gender and racialised identities?
Janice Smith
 
What is career about if not biography? Examining the ‘shift’ to constructivist and interdisciplinary approaches in career counselling.
Hazel Reid
 
Poetry written from the words of people given a diagnosis of dementia: a narrative analysis
Maria Castro and Kitty Clark-McGhee
 
‘Those Letters Keep Me Going’: epistolary spaces and resilience building processes in US soldiers to sweet heart war correspondence, 1942-1945.
Anne Byrne and Tanja Kovačič
 
Afterword: Hazel Reid and Linden West
 
 20% Discount Available - enter the code FLR40 at
 checkout*
 Hb: 978-0-415-73227-7 | £72.00
* Offer cannot be used in conjunction with any other offer or discount and only applies to
books purchased directly via our website.
For more details, or to request a copy for review, please contact: Claire Fewson, Marketing
Manager, claire.fewson@tandf.co.uk
 For more information visit:
www.routledge.com/9780415732277
   
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6. New! Journal of Narrative Politics
 
We are so pleased to announce that the inaugural issue of Journal of Narrative Politics is now available. http://journalofnarrativepolitics.com/ It is completely open-access. We are still actively reviewing submissions for upcoming issues. We are open to the continued creative development of global political scholarship.
 
All the best,
Elizabeth Dauphinee for Journal of Narrative Politics
   
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7. CNR-NOVELLA graduate research seminars, 2014-15
 
CNR-NOVELLA postgraduate research seminars, 2014-15
All seminars take place at the Library, Thomas Coram Research Unit, Institute of Educatiom, 27-8 Woburn Square, London WC1HOAA, 5-6.30pm, except where marked.
 
October 7 – Su Corcoran, Manchester University, Using narratives in Kiswahili and English to explore the experiences of reintegration of formerly street-connected children in Kenya.
 Start time: 5.30pm
 
November 4- Dimitra Vassiliadou, University of Crete, Narrative self-analysis and melancholic state(ment)s in 19th century family letters.
 
December 9 – Irene Madina, Deusto University, Bilbao, Emotional education through narratives about the Basque conflict: a critical understanding of political violence.
 
February 3- Desiree Saddik, University of Essex and UEL, Narratives of expert witnesses.
 
March 3 – Anna-Lisa Fransson, Orebro University, The power of storytelling. Silence, frame-contraction and happy ending in Swedish Baltic Sea gas pipeline narration.
 
May 5 – Sue Chowdhry, Robert Gordon University, ‘They know best’: exploring larger women’s embodied experiences of pregnancy and childbirth.
 
June 2 – Anna Hulusjo, Malmo University, Narrating prostitution experience.
 
For further details, please email Corinne Squire: c.squire@uel.ac.uk
 
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8. IASH, University of Edinburgh, research seminars Autumn 2014
 
A list of research seminars and events taking place within the College of Humanities and Social Science, University of Edinburgh, has been compiled by the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities (IASH): http://www.iash.ed.ac.uk/news-and-events/college-events/
 
Dr Peta Freestone & Donald Ferguson
Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities (IASH)
The University of Edinburgh
E: iash@ed.ac.uk 
T: 0131 650 4671
W: www.iash.ed.ac.uk
Twitter: @IASH_Edinburgh
Facebook: iash.edinburgh


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21/04/14post
Lives & Letters Mailing: April 2014 - Whites Writing Whiteness project update

Dear Colleagues
 
We are delighted to announce the outcome of our 'Vote for the best Olive Schreiner Letter' competition, which closed on 31 March.  
 
We (Liz Stanley & Andrea Salter) as the editors of the Schreiner letters online (http://www.oliveschreiner.org/) identified a 'top ten' to choose from and added up the number of votes received for each letter, drawing an anonymous winner from a felt hat not once but three times, for we received equal numbers of votes for three letters - for Karl Pearson on minds going through stages like a caterpillar http://www.oliveschreiner.org/vre?view=collections&colid=74&letterid=85, for Alice Greene on the meerkat attack http://www.oliveschreiner.org/vre?view=collections&colid=96&letterid=50 and for Edward Carpenter on marriage, friendship and financial independence http://www.oliveschreiner.org/vre?view=collections&colid=71&letterid=73.
 
We have notified the respective winners and each will receive a Schreiner publication in the post very soon! Our commiserations to those who were not selected; thank you very much indeed for voting and providing such stimulating and varied reasons for choosing particular Schreiner letters. We tip our collective felt hat to you.
 
We include below a small, anonymised selection of excerpts from the emails we received from voters giving their reasons for choosing particular letters (these appear with the kind permission of their authors):
 
Regarding the Karl Pearson letter:
 
...'I think the letter lovely and expresses the idea against the bifurcation of nature, I really loved it… so much ahead of its time, and gives hope too for times when we feel low and unproductive!'
 
'...I vote 'To Karl Pearson, on minds going through stages like a caterpillar'. My reason is that in this letter Schreiner intelligently used a natural truth, from a caterpillar to a butterfly, to encourage Pearson to understand his intellectual potential, and emphasise the unity of opposites in a developmental process. Schreiner was very confident and generous providing inspiration and offering her support for Pearson. '
 
Regarding the Alice Greene letter:
 
'...Olive Schreiner's spirited description of the local parson's visit reads like a movie script.  She sketches the farcical tangle of events involving her beloved pet meerkats and the Dickensian parson with sharp wit, detail and mirth, enabling the reader to form a vivid picture of the comedic interlude - an example of Olive Schreiner's often underrated sense of humour and her ironic depiction of small-town life in the Karoo.
 
Regarding the Edward Carpenter letter:
 
'I had just finished Sheila Rowbotham’s excellent biography of Edward Carpenter when I received the invitation to vote for my favourite Olive Schreiner letter. It turned out that Schreiner’s letter to Carpenter was one of those listed in the competition. Reading the letter was a revelation—it seemed to me that Schreiner was exploring an issue that was as relevant to my own life as it was to her. Like Carpenter, I am gay. But unlike him, for some years I was in a heterosexual marriage and am now married to a woman (we have been together 22 years). I found Schreiner’s comments about economic relations between men and women as opposed to economic relations between two men to be prescient. ...'
 
Thank you very much to all those who voted in the competition. We really enjoyed reading your responses and hope you enjoyed reading the nominated letters as much as we have enjoyed working on them. We would encourage all readers to delve further into the Olive Schreiner Letters Online to unearth their own personal favourites - please do share with us your discoveries! All the nominated letters, with live links to them, can be found: http://www.oliveschreinerletters.ed.ac.uk/Announcements.html#VoteBestLetter, while nearly 5000 more extant letters are freely available to access as http://www.oliveschreiner.org/ and can be read by collection, by addressee, by date and also via a wide range of searches.
 
With best wishes,
Liz Stanley and Andrea Salter

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20/02/14post – Lives & Letters Mailing: February 2014

Dear Colleagues

Welcome to a bumper Lives & Letters Mailing for February 2014!

This mailing contains information about:

1. Reminder: Vote for the best Olive Schreiner letter! Closing date 31 March 2014

2. NOVELLA/CNR symposium - Mapping the present, envisioning the future: Stories as routes towards understanding and action, 28 February 2014, London

3 INVITATION to the next IASH Speculative Lunch, University of Edinburgh, 28 February 2014

4. CFP: 'Troubling Narratives: Identity Matters', The Institute for Research in Citizenship and Applied Human Sciences, University of Huddersfield, 19-20 June 2014

5. Oxford Centre for Life-Writing blog and events

6. [CLHLWR] Free one-day workshop 4 April: Public and Personal Archives: Creative Negotiations, Creativity Zone, University of Sussex

7. A short course for the creative, at the Mass Observation Archive this Spring. March/April. Brighton

8. National Seminar on Women's Autobiography in India: Theory and Practice, 29-30 March 2014, India

9. Call for Papers for early career scholars: Workshops The diaries of Anne Frank. Contextualisation— Reception— Representations, Several dates, Germany and Sussex

10. Call for Submissions: Issue of Biography on Online Auto/Biography, 1 July 2014

11. Call for Papers: War and Life Writing, 31 May 2014

12. What is a letter? An interdisciplinary approach, 2-4 July 2014, Oxford (UK)


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1.  Reminder: Vote for the best Olive Schreiner letter! Closing date 31 March 2014

Olive Schreiner, one of the great feminist theorists and a writer who published across a wide range of genres, also wrote c5000 extant letters. These have been published by the Olive Schreiner Letters Online at www.oliveschreiner.org<http://www.oliveschreiner.org/> and are freely available to access - they can be read by collection, by addressee, by date and also via a wide range of searches.

Vote for the best Olive Schreiner letter - the prize is a nice Unwin edition of Schreiner's Dreams, first published in 1890. We (Liz Stanley & Andrea Salter) as the editors of the Schreiner letters have identified a 'top ten' to choose from. For the letter which receives the most votes, we shall put the names/email addresses of all those who voted for it in a hat and then randomly select one winner. That person gets the prize! We ask those voting to provide a brief (50 words max) comment on their reasons for selecting a particular letter. We hope to include an anonymised selection of these comments on the Olive Schreiner Letters Project website once the competition is over. The closing date for voting is 31 March 2014, and your vote should be sent by email to: andrea.salter@ed.ac.uk<mailto:andrea.salter@ed.ac.uk> - thank you!

And the nominated letters, with live links to them, are as follows - enjoy reading them! A list of the nominated letters can also be found at: http://www.oliveschreinerletters.ed.ac.uk/Announcements.html#VoteBestLetter


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2. NOVELLA/CNR symposium - Mapping the present, envisioning the future: Stories as routes towards understanding and action, 28 February 2014, London

To register for the event please visit the events page on our online store: http://store.ioe.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&deptid=112&catid=42&prodid=257

A NOVELLA (Narratives of Everyday Lives and Linked Approaches) and CNR (Centre for Narrative Research) symposium

Friday, February 28th
Elvin Hall, Institute of Education, 20 Bedford Way, London WC1H 0AL

Symposium: 1.00-4.30pm

Molly Andrews (CNR and NOVELLA):  Trafficking in human possibilities: The power of narrative imagination

Ann Phoenix (Thomas Coram Research Unit, IoE and NOVELLA): Crafting imagined futures from narratives of the past and present: Adult narratives of growing up in visibly ethnically different childhoods

Corinne Squire (CNR and NOVELLA): Narrating inequities

Michael Murray (Centre for Psychological Research, Keele University): Community workers' life stories

Discussant: Jane Elliott (NOVELLA and Centre for Longitudinal Research, Institute of Education)

Reception and book launch: 4.30-6.00pm

Introductory comments: Maria Tamboukou

This event marks the launch of two books: Narrative Imagination and Everyday Life (Oxford 2014) by Molly Andrews (NOVELLA and Centre for Narrative Research, University of East London) and Living with HIV and ARVS: Three-letter Lives (Palgrave 2013) by Corinne Squire (NOVELLA and Centre for Narrative Research, University of East London). Both books examine connections between the ways in which people narrate their current lived realities, their understandings of the present and its histories, and their construction of alternative storylines for the future.

These themes are developed in the symposium's other contributions. Ann Phoenix (Thomas Coram Research Unit, Institute of Education, and NOVELLA) will talk about her work on the situated imagination, and Michael Murray (Centre for Psychological Research, Keele University) will discuss his work on the life stories of community workers. Jane Elliott (NOVELLA and Institute of Education) will be the discussant.  Part of the afternoon will be devoted to a collective exercise of making sense of the stories people tell about their lives.

The day will conclude with a reception and book launch, introduced by Maria Tamboukou (Feminist Research Group and Centre for Narrative Research, University of East London).

Symposium fees: £30 (£15 for students).

To register for the event please visit the events page on our online store: http://store.ioe.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&deptid=112&catid=42&prodid=257

The book launch is open to all without registration (RSVP to novella@ioe.ac.uk), and is free of charge.

For further information about the NOVELLA project and all our events please visit our website http://www.novella.ac.uk/ or contact Rowena Lamb on 020 7612 6921 / novella@ioe.ac.uk. 

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3. INVITATION to the next IASH Speculative Lunch, University of Edinburgh, 28 February 2014

Topic for discussion: "Towards a more 'human business'? Exploring the missing links between the humanities and business studies" (see background note below)

Date: Friday, 28 February, 1-2 p.m.

Venue: Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities, Hope Park Square, University of Edinburgh

Sandwiches and soft drinks will be provided.

To book a place, email: iash@ed.ac.uk
N.B. The number of spaces for these lunches is restricted to 15 and places are allocated on a strictly first-come-first-served basis.

These informal discussion meetings offer a forum for research ideas at an early stage of formulation. If you have a research interest in the topic and would like to know what colleagues from different Schools might have to contribute from another perspective, the lunch will offer an opportunity to explore possibilities. These 'blue skies' events are open to all members of staff in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, but for reasons of space and to help concentrate discussion, numbers at each meeting are limited to a maximum of 15. Each meeting is free to structure discussion as it wishes; no 'Outcomes' are inferred or required!

TOPIC DESCRIPTION:

"Towards a more 'human business'? Exploring the missing links between the humanities and business studies"

This speculative lunch aims to explore possible areas of collaboration between the humanities and business studies. Links between these two disciplines are many but they are often overlooked or forgotten. Not many in business studies, for instance, recall that most of the accounting terminology shares the same etymology with rhetoric and the art of memory (the words 'inventory' and 'record' being only two examples of a non-economic genealogy for accounting practices).
Similarly, while business studies often draw on current works in the humanities (from history, anthropology, ethics and religious studies, to name but a few) not many scholars in the humanities think of exploring possibilities for their thinking to inform, and cross fertilise with, business studies and address business problems which are impossible to solve because of incomplete, contradictory, and changing requirements all difficult to recognize. With this speculative lunch we want to explore the space 'in between' business and the humanities and begin to gather a community around this space at the University of Edinburgh.

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4. CFP: 'Troubling Narratives: Identity Matters', The Institute for Research in Citizenship and Applied Human Sciences, University of Huddersfield, 19-20 June 2014

Confirmed keynote speakers for the conference are:
Ann Phoenix, University of London
Ken Plummer, University of Essex

This conference builds on the University of Huddersfield’s long held tradition of hosting a bi-annual
conference on narrative research. It seeks to provide a fresh context for the development and
dissemination of new research, ideas, perspectives and methodologies in the field of narrative research
and enquiry and aims to bring together scholars working in a range of disciplinary fields. ‘Narrative’ is well
known for its looseness of definition, its multiplicity of approaches and its interdisciplinarity, which over
the years has led to a richness and diversity of narrative work. Identities, both private and public and
individual and collective, have long been a focus for narrative researchers, where the content, form and
effects of identity story-telling have been explored in a range of areas and contexts. The focus of 'Troubling
Narratives: Identity Matters' is to address the ‘troubles’ that now surround contemporary narratives of
identity, and the ways in which previous work may simultaneously inform but also trouble and be
‘troubled’ by new narrative work in the broad area of ‘identities’.

We invite contributions from researchers interested in using narratives across a range of disciplines
including, sociology, gender studies, psychology, law, politics, criminology, philosophy, history,
anthropology, social work, education, and business and management.

Abstracts should be no longer than 250 words. We invite papers in the form of 20 minute oral
presentations, and also workshop sessions and poster presentations (the format should be clearly stated in
the abstract). All submissions must include the author/speaker(s) name, title of paper, university or
organizational affiliation, and contact information. The deadline for submission of abstract is Monday 3rd
February 2014. Please email your abstract to the conference organisers at: troublingnarratives@hud.ac.uk
with ‘conference abstract’ in the subject line. You will be notified about whether your paper has been
accepted soon after Monday 10th March 2014.

The conference registration deadline is 5th June 2014. Conference costs are: Full rate: £150 to include
conference dinner, or £110 excluding dinner. Student rate: £50 to include conference dinner, or £30
excluding dinner.

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5. Oxford Centre for Life-Writing Blog and Events

For information about Lectures and Events, please see: https://www.wolfson.ox.ac.uk/clusters/life-writing

Hello all,

We are pleased to announce that the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing blog is back up and running. At the moment we (fellow publicity managers Matthew Sellers and Lucinda Fenny, and I) are summarizing the OCLW events on the blog, and we may have a few exciting other things to post over the next few weeks as well.

Please take a look at oxlifewriting.wordpress.com and do feel free to comment on the posts.

All best wishes,

Nanette O'Brien
PRS DPhil candidate
OCLW Life-Writing Scholar

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6. [CLHLWR] Free one-day workshop 4 April: Public and Personal Archives: Creative Negotiations, Creativity Zone, University of Sussex

You are warmly invited to attend this exciting free workshop in April:

Public and Personal Archives: Creative Negotiations Friday 4 April 11.00 – 5.30 pm Creativity Zone, University of Sussex Pevensey III, Room C7. Find it on the Campus Map or in google maps.

This free workshop explores the relationship of public and personal in different life story projects which prioritize listening, sound and voice. Three presentations will discuss questions of politics, representation and aesthetics which arise in using life stories in creative works.

The aim of the event is to generate discussion around the work by allowing hour-long slots for each presentation. Students are especially welcome to attend.

The event includes a display of video, photography, and sound work by Suze Adams, Jacqueline Butler, Rosy Martin, Sally Waterman and Lizzie Thynne all artists associated with the Family Ties Network.

Presented by the Family Ties Network and Centre for Life History and Life Writing Research, University of Sussex. Supported by the Leverhulme Trust.

THIS EVENT IS FREE BUT PLEASE REGISTER WITH ALEXANDRA LOSKE, a.loske@sussex.ac.uk

For more information please see the full programme and poster attached to this email, or follow this link:
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/clhlwr/research/conferences/publicandpersonalarchives

With best wishes,
Alexandra

Alexandra Loske
Department of Art History
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/profiles/107019
and Centre for Life History and Life Writing Research http://www.sussex.ac.uk/clhlwr/ University of Sussex Falmer Brighton BN1 9SH UK Tel : +44 (0)1273 476065

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7. A short course for the creative, at the Mass Observation Archive this Spring. March/April. Brighton

Booking open now.

An Anthropology of Ourselves:

Exploring Mass Observation for Creative Projects

Tutor: Dr Sam Carroll
Venue: The Keep
Dates: 21st March, 28th March, 4th April and 11th April 2014
Four day schools on Fridays, 10am to 4pm

Cost: £95/£45 Unwaged or Student

Discover the unique Mass Observation (MO) Archive and its inspirational value both for creative arts and community projects, in the beautiful bespoke setting of The Keep archive. This course will suit writers, photographers, dramatists and anyone with an interest in setting up a creative community enterprise that engages with life history.

To book a place visit here:

http://www.massobs.org.uk/events.htm

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8.  National Seminar on Women's Autobiography in India: Theory and Practice, 29-30 March 2014, India

full name / name of organization:
KAKATIYA UNIVERSITY, WARANGAL, SOUTH INDIA

contact email:
kpku61@gmail.com

Department of English
KAKATIYA UNIVERSITY
Warangal, India-506 009

Call for Papers

UGC Sponsored
Two-Day National Seminar on
Women’s Autobiography in India: Theory and Practice

March 29-30, 2014

Women’s life narratives/histories, a generic term for women’s autobiographies, memoirs and testimonios, hagiographies has emerged as a genre, consequent to the postmodernist thrust on liberation discourse. Though these narratives blur genre boundaries, they depict the ‘I’ with a focus on the individual—notion of a private self—revealing a split between public and private self-representations. Violating the parameters of the canonical autobiography, they create testimonios of gender, caste, class and religion, and provide an alternative source of history. The works narrate the self vis-à-vis family, society and politics bearing witness to gendered subordination. Narrated in the first person, and the narrator being a protagonist or witness of the events recounted, the unity of the narration could be a significant personal experience. Primarily aimed at communicating the subordinated predicament, oppression, suppression and struggle for emancipation, these writings claim the agency, expecting the reader to respond and judge her predicament. Based on memory, experience and identity, women narrators reproduce the cultural modes of self narrating, simultaneously critiquing the status quo.

Life narratives generate new possibilities of being read. Whichever be the genre, women’s life narratives seek affirmation in the correcting mode. By bringing the personal life into public, women’s narratives challenge and articulate gender concerns vis-a-vis caste and religion. Therefore, they cannot be reduced to ‘narrations of pain and sorrow’ or ‘memories of a hateful life’ but go beyond these. They also have a bearing on research and pedagogy in that, the historical narrators of experience are a means of introducing counter views on gender. Life narratives perform the roles of projecting women’s triumphs and inducing guilt in the minds of oppressors by recounting how they were wronged. Reading woman’s life narratives without a political ideology stands the risk of making a spectacle of women’s suffering and pain. The narrations bring new insights into male dominant academic institutions, assuming importance in the construction of curriculum. The proposed seminar provides a platform for discussion of women’s life narratives to explore links between the historical devaluation of women, their writing practices, exclusion of their writing from the canon of traditional autobiographies, cultural biases in defining the selfhood, revising the prevailing concept of autobiography and other perspectives that the paper presenters can think of. Interested scholars may send in abstracts in 500 words in MS Word format.

Papers can focus on the following or any other research questions/issues:

Can women’s life writing be distinguished from that of male authors?
 Why lives of woman narratives are important?
 Can women remember and write differently?
 How can this difference be historically located?
 How do women articulate gender, caste, class and religion?
 How do women narrators deconstruct their gendered selves?
 How do women narrators re-construct their selves?
 How do they recount the withdrawal of the self from the public domain?
 How do they create new spaces for themselves?
 What are the specific themes and sub-themes of women’s autobiographical narratives?
 What do these narratives reveal about representation and identity?

~ ~ ~
 Keynote Speaker: Prof Susie Tharu, EFL University, Hyderabad
 Valedictory Address: Dr K. Lalitha, Yugantar, Hyderabad
 Plenary Speakers: Prof G. Thirupathi Kumar, EFL University, Hyderabad
 MS Gita Ramaswamy, Hyderabad Book Trust
 Dr H. Kalpana, Pondicherry University
 Dr Aparna Lanjewar Bose, EFL University, Hyderabad
 Dr Murali Manohar, University of Hyderabad
 Important Dates
 Submission of Abstracts: 28th February 2014
 Acceptance will be conveyed by 3rd March 2014
 Submission of Full Papers by 25th March, 2014

Note: TA and DA will be paid to invited speakers; paper presenters may arrange for their own TA and DA. However, local hospitality will be extended to all the participants.

K. Purushotham
 Professor, Head and Coordinator, SAP
 Director of the Seminar
kpku61@gmail.com

B. Deepa Jyothi
 Assistant Professor and Deputy Coordinator, SAP
 Coordinator of the Seminar
deepa.jyothi91@gmail.com

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9. Call for Papers for early career scholars: Workshops The diaries of Anne Frank. Contextualisation— Reception— Representations, Several dates, Germany and Sussex

 Lichtenberg Kolleg, Georg August Universität Göttingen/ Fritz Bauer Institute, Frankfurt

 Workshop 1 - Contextualisation: September 2014 (Florence, 17-18 September 2014)
 Workshop 2 - Reception: April 2015 (Sussex)
 Workshop 3 - Representations: September 2015 (t.b.a.)

 Deadlines CFP: 15 March 2014 (workshop 1)/ 1 May 2014 (workshops 2/3)

 Seventy years after the end of the Second World War our knowledge about the war and the Holocaust is based upon a wide variety of sources and a rich range of historiographies. Amongst the first sources to be published, and quickly acquiring a rather unique status, were the diary notes of Anne Frank. Around the world many children and teenagers have read and are still reading editions of Anne´s diaries—either at school or in private. In the biography of many readers as well as in national commemorative cultures the engagement with the war and the Holocaust began with the diary of Anne Frank. It became a symbol.

 So far much research has focused on important issues such as the authenticity of the diaries. The Lichtenberg Kolleg at the Georg August Universität Göttingen and the Fritz Bauer Institute at the University of Frankfurt are currently jointly preparing a new historical-critical edition of the diaries of Anne Frank in Dutch, English and German as well as an accompanying research monograph. This new project aims to open up a range of additional and new perspectives, exploring the history of Anne Frank and her diaries within the framework of more comparative European, if not global cultural, intellectual, literary and political history.

 In addition to a number of fellows working at the Lichtenberg Kolleg on issues of contextualisation, reception and representation of the diaries, we also plan to explore these questions in-depth during three workshops that will be held in September 2014 (Contextualisation), April 2015 (Reception) and September 2015 (Representations) respectively.

 Our first workshop will focus on ‘contextualisation’. What were the broader cultural, intellectual and political contexts from which the diaries originated? Which literary models were available to Anne Frank when she wrote her texts? Which cultural and moral connections did she make? To what extent do the diaries belong to Jewish cultures? What were the political circumstances of Jews in the occupied Netherlands, in Germany or the neighbouring states? Which experiences and traditions did the Frank family bring to the Netherlands? What were the war time experiences of teenagers—in Amsterdam, London, Frankfurt, St. Petersburg/Leningrad?

 Our second workshop will focus on ‘reception’. Why and how were the diaries read across the globe? What are the translation and publication histories of the diaries? Which metamorphoses did the history of Anne Frank experience, as it was adapted in a wide variety of regions, countries and cultures across the globe for decades? How did a teenage girl, living in hiding due to the Nazi persecution of the Jews, became a worldwide symbol in the memory cultures of the Holocaust? And what, to open up a final normative dimension, should the legacy of the diaries be in the near future?
 Our third workshop will focus on ‘representation’. How have the diaries since their original publication been adapted and represented? What did, and does, it mean to perform the diaries, to put them on the stage, in the theatre, in the movies? How has the legacy of Anne Frank been represented in exhibitions all over the world? What lessons for future generations have been forwarded and suggested on the basis of the diaries in all these representations?

 Early career scholars are invited to send their abstracts for a 30-45 minute paper to participate in one of the workshops. Papers given at these workshops will be considered for inclusion in the research monograph, to be submitted to Cambridge University Press in 2016. Please send your abstract (600 words maximum) by March 15, 2014 (workshop 1) or May 1, 3014 (workshops 2/3) to: lichtenbergkolleg@zvw.uni-goettingen.de.
 
 Dr. Gerben Zaagsma
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen
Lichtenberg-Kolleg - the Göttingen Institute of Advanced Study
Geismar Landstraße 11
D-37083 Göttingen
Germany
Email: lichtenbergkolleg@zvw.uni-goettingen.de
Visit the website at http://lichtenberg-kolleg.org/2014/02/10/call-for-papers-the-diaries-of-anne-frank-contextualisation-reception-representations/ 

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10. Call for Submissions: Issue of Biography on Online Auto/Biography, 1 July 2014

The editors of the journal Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly seek contributions to an issue devoted to the various modes of online auto/biography that have emerged in the decade following the journal’s Winter 2003 special issue “Lives Online,” which brought together scholars examining online diaries, personal home pages, and some of the earliest manifestations of blogs.

Web 2.0 technologies have given rise to a welter of other powerful formats for online self-representation, including social media like Facebook, Mixi and Twitter and media sharing services like YouTube, Tumblr, and Vine. Robust blogging platforms like Wordpress and Movable Type, and virtual worlds like Second Life and The Sims have continued to develop their interactive platforms. These media are affording users myriad possibilities for documenting their lives, organizing social movements, gaining access to print publication, contributing to others’ self-representations, and crafting (and inventing) identities.

We invite submissions that engage these developments within the framework of life writing studies. We are particularly interested in articles that address theoretical and/or methodological questions pertaining to the study of online life writing:

-- how does online auto/biography present challenges to traditional research methods, particularly for qualitative scholars?

-- how must scholars in the field reformulate perennial questions about authorship, genre, subjectivity, truth, power, ethics, and politics to account for forms of auto/biographical cultural production that are in many ways unprecedented?

-- how are researchers coping with the mercurial and ephemeral nature of some manifestations of online auto/biography?

-- what ethical questions do scholars in this in this area confront?

-- how are these media transforming practices of ethnography and oral history?

Other welcome topics include

-- social media platforms and practices outside North America and Europe (for example, Mixi and Sina Weibo)

-- the use of online channels to mobilize life stories in conjunction with social and political movements, political campaigns, human rights activism, and other collective initiatives

-- the role of the Internet in negotiating identities and affiliations within and across minority, indigenous, and diasporic communities

-- intersections of the digital and the embodied (for example, the lived experience of race, gender, sexuality, disability, and/or illness)

-- the creation of communities through online life narrative practices, including Internet-based support groups and collaborative projects

-- the place of visual media in online life writing

-- the impact of the constraints and affordances of specific programming languages, algorithms, platforms, and interface designs on online auto/biographical practices

-- self-representation in networked multiplayer games and simulations

-- corporate promotion and control of social media services and user information

-- privacy and security issues related to online auto/biography

-- hoaxes and scams based on deceptive online self-representations

-- new approaches to writing biography in digital media

Please submit complete essays no longer than 9000 words by July 1, 2014, to biograph@hawaii.edu. John David Zuern and Guest Editor Laurie McNeill expect to respond to authors by September 1, 2014.  Final revisions will be due by December 15, 2014.

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11. Call for Papers: War and Life Writing, 31 May 2014

Papers are invited for publication in a special issue entitled War and Life Writing. Ed. Louise O. Vasvari and I-Chun Wang. CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture 17.2 (June 2015): (Purdue University Press ISSN 1481-4374).

Throughout history, humans share(d) similar experiences in war: they narrate their experiences and document suffering, trauma, dislocation, memory, etc. Life writing on war is often about (im)migration, separation, and dreams of return. The guest editors of the special issue on War and Life Writing invite studies on life writing in all its forms: auto/biography, memoir, testimony, diaries, letters, works in media other than print, as well as visual representation of war from all periods of human history.

The preferred theoretical background of work is (comparative) cultural studies. Articles in the journal are 6000-7000 words: for the style of the journal consult . Articles published in the journal are double-blind peer reviewed and indexed, among others, in the MLA International Bibliography, the Thomson Reuters ISI Arts and Humanities Citation Index and Social Sciences Citation Index, Scopus, etc.

Please submit papers to Louise O. Vasvari at ( louise.vasvari@stonybrook.edu) and to I-Chun Wang (icwanghsu@hotmail.com) at before May 31, 2014.

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12. What is a letter? An interdisciplinary approach, 2-4 July 2014, Oxford (UK)

Deadline for submitting abstracts: 3 March 2014

Over recent years the number of studies, conferences, international networks, and editorial projects which focus on letters, letter writers, and letter-writing cultures has grown remarkably. As a result, our understanding of the letter as a form of text, as a material object, and as a generator or reflector of social norms and cultural practices has become more nuanced. However, at the same time our concept of the letter has become less well defined, as theoretical aspects of the epistolary form have not received comparable attention. The topical, interdisciplinary discussion of what exactly a ‘letter’ is and what terms and methods one should adopt to deal with it, is still very much in its infancy.

There are many questions to answer: how – if at all – can we conceptualize letters as a genre, and what is to be gained from that? What characteristics of letter-writing are relevant across disciplines? What are the key frames of reference in the process: single letter, correspondence, or ‘epistolarium’ (Liz Stanley)? In what ways do variable transmission processes – including the collection, archiving, editing, or exhibition of letters – influence our perception of the epistolary? Finally, and this is perhaps the most important question, how does one approach a type of text which is used both as a pragmatic and as a literary form and which is rooted in historical reality while at the same time retaining its potential to deploy fictional qualities?

In order to address these and related questions, the symposium aims to bring together scholars from a variety of disciplines and countries, and from universities and public institutions, for an exchange of knowledge which will lay the foundations for an inclusive and interdisciplinary model of and methodology for analysing letters. The symposium will primarily consider and compare theories and practices of letter-writing from the eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries, but proposals relating to earlier periods are also welcome. We invite papers (20–25 minutes in length) which address aspects of letters and letter-writing against this background. Analyses of theoretical aspects of letters as a type of text are welcome on their own or in the context of a case study or studies.

We would expressly like to invite scholars from the following disciplines to submit a proposal: linguistics, philosophy, psychology, medicine, sociology, theology, media studies, law, history of art, history (including, in particular, postal history), editorial studies, cultural studies, and modern languages (including English).

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

* Genre typology
* Types of letters, themes of letters
* Relationships between pragmatic and literary qualities in and of letters
* The effect of editing/archiving/exhibiting letters (practices and processes) on defining the genre (and vice versa)
* Aspects of transmission
* Letters in competition with other media

English and German are the working languages of the symposium, and an interpreter will be present to summarize papers and assist with the discussion. The papers will be published in a conference volume. We hope that the international and interdisciplinary focus of the symposium will lead to further collaborative projects.

If you are interested in giving a paper, please send an abstract of no more than 350 words plus a short paragraph with bio-bibliographical information to:

Dr Marie Isabel Matthews-Schlinzig (Oxford), isabel.matthews-schlinzig@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk

Caroline Socha (Heidelberg), caroline.socha@gs.uni-heidelberg.de

The deadline for submitting abstracts is 3 March 2014.

Please note: travel expenses and accommodation costs will, in all likelihood, not be reimbursed; St Edmund Hall has agreed to offer speakers single en-suite rooms (including breakfast) at a discounted rate.

               
---
Dr Andrea Salter, Research Associate, Sociology, School of Social & Political Science, Chrystal Macmillan Building, University of Edinburgh, UK.
http://www.sps.ed.ac.uk/staff/sociology/salter_andrea
http://www.whiteswritingwhiteness.ed.ac.uk
http://www.oliveschreiner.org and http://www.oliveschreinerletters.ed.ac.uk



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10/02/14post
– Lives & Letters Mailing: February 2014 - Whites Writing Whiteness project update

Welcome to another Lives and Letters mailing. This mailing provides an update about the Whites Writing Whiteness project and contains information about:

1. Whites Writing Whiteness website spring-clean
2. WWW Blog - New Post on 'Thinking with Norbert Elias, about race…'
3. Cabinet of Curiosities - a brand new WWW feature

1. The WWW Spring-Clean

The Whites Writing Whiteness website (http://www.whiteswritingwhiteness.ed.ac.uk) has had a makeover, to give greater and more intuitive ease of use for its readers. It also provides a number of new features.

The Home page provides introductory information - and it also now has two clickable visual buttons, one giving immediate access to the latest blog post, and the other a direct link to the latest project news. 'Project Overview' now brings together all of the pages concerned with the organisational side of WWW activities, and its content has also been expanded. 'Read All About' contains downloadable project publications, and also a growing portfolio of annotated reading lists. In addition to those already available, new lists on two very different topics are on their way - the impact of Sharpeville and Soweto in changing the moral and political order of race, and the letters and related writings of missionaries in southern Africa.

'News and Blog' gives access to two pages, one is recent project news, the other features our growing portfolio of blog posts - and for information about the most recent blog, 'Thinking with Norbert Elias, about race…', please see below.

The WWW webpages now also have a brand new addition. This is the 'Cabinet of Curiosities ', and for details please see below.

2. WWW Project Blog - 'Thinking with Norbert Elias, about race…' (http://www.whiteswritingwhiteness.ed.ac.uk/news-and-blog/blog/thinking-with-norbert-elias/)

The work of sociologist Norbert Elias provides much of the ideas framework for the Whites Writing Whiteness project, in particular drawing on Elias's ideas about figuration, sociogenesis, and civilising/decivilizing processes. This post reviews a number of helpful books, including an important 2013 monograph from Dunning and Hughes, and also in 'thinking with Norbert Elias' it discusses how his key ideas are being taken up by the WWW project.

3. Cabinet of Curiosities (http://www.whiteswritingwhiteness.ed.ac.uk/cabinet-of-curiosities/)

Inspired, intrigued, appalled, puzzled and otherwise fascinated by the encased displays of the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford - a 'cabinet of curiosities' on a monumental scale - WWW is developing its own collection of things 'whose categorical boundaries, and so whose definitional and ontological being, are not yet decided.'

The WWW Cabinet of Curiosities invokes the curious and the not yet known, and its contents raise puzzles about the 'coming to know' involved and the fetters on and boundaries to this. The first three items in the Cabinet are: 'On curiosities and archives', 'A letter is a letter is…', and 'Colossus v. Almighty might have been'. Read on!

Best wishes,
Liz Stanley and Andrea Salter
               

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26/01/14post – Vote for the best Olive Schreiner letter! Closing date 31 March 2014

Vote for the best Olive Schreiner letter!
Closing date 31 March 2014

Olive Schreiner, one of the great feminist theorists and a writer who published across a wide range of genres, also wrote c5000 extant letters. These have been published by the Olive Schreiner Letters Online at www.oliveschreiner.org and are freely available to access - they can be read by collection, by addressee, by date and also via a wide range of searches.

Vote for the best Olive Schreiner letter - the prize is a nice Unwin edition of Schreiner's Dreams, first published in 1890. We (Liz Stanley & Andrea Salter) as the editors of the Schreiner letters have identified a 'top ten' to choose from. For the letter which receives the most votes, we shall put the names/email addresses of all those who voted for it in a hat and then randomly select one winner. That person gets the prize! We ask those voting to provide a brief (50 words max) comment on their reasons for selecting a particular letter. We hope to include an anonymised selection of these comments on the Olive Schreiner Letters Project website once the competition is over. The closing date for voting is 31 March 2014, and your vote should be sent by email to: andrea.salter@ed.ac.uk - thank you!

And the nominated letters, with live links to them, are as follows - enjoy reading them! 


1. To Ray Lanchester, on marriage
Olive Schreiner: Havelock Ellis 2006.29/24<
http://www.oliveschreiner.org/vre?view=collections&colid=40&letterid=22>
To Prof Ray Lanchester from OS, Royal Spa Hotel, Shanklin, 31 Jan Feb/86, ...You say: "It appears to me quite a truth proposition...

2. To Karl Pearson, on minds going through stages like a caterpillar
Karl Pearson, July 1886: Karl Pearson 840/4/3/34-39<
http://www.oliveschreiner.org/vre?view=collections&colid=74&letterid=85>
Tuesday night, Dear K.P. , I have been reading your letter over again, & there are many things it makes me want to say. , ..

3. To Edward Carpenter, on marriage, friendship & financial independence
Edward Carpenter, 8 October 1894: Edward Carpenter 359/73<
http://www.oliveschreiner.org/vre?view=collections&colid=71&letterid=73>
The Homestead, Kimberley, South Africa , Oct 8 / 94 , Dear old E. C. , The marriage pamphlet has come. I think it splendid!

4. To Alice Greene, on the great meerkat attack!
Alice Greene, 14 October 1904: Olive Schreiner BC16/Box3/Fold3/1904/50<
http://www.oliveschreiner.org/vre?view=collections&colid=96&letterid=50>
Hanover, October 14th 1904, Dear Friend, You will have wondered that I did not write before but I have not been well...

5. To Betty Molteno, on more Cronwright problems
Betty Molteno, 23 July 1904: Olive Schreiner BC16/Box3/Fold3/1904/29<
http://www.oliveschreiner.org/vre?view=collections&colid=96&letterid=29>
Dear Friend,, I’m so glad it has been such a good time with your brother, & I’m so thankful you are keeping w.

6. To Julia Solly, on the politics of the Women's Enfranchisement League
Julia Solly nee Muspratt, May 1908: Olive Schreiner BC16/Box11/Fold1/Dated/26<
http://www.oliveschreiner.org/vre?view=collections&colid=113&letterid=26>
Dear Mrs Solly, I can’t quite understand your letter & perhaps you don’t quite understand me...

7. To John X. Merriman - on the backwards and forwards movements of how societies change
John X. Merriman MSC 15/1912:132<
http://www.oliveschreiner.org/vre?view=collections&colid=51&letterid=34>: De Aar, Aug 11th 1912, Dear Mr Merriman., Re. your letter. No, I do not take a sorrowful view of life generally...

8. To Adela Smith, on the women's movement being so vast
Letters/503<
http://www.oliveschreiner.org/vre?view=collections&colid=137&letterid=503>: To Mrs. Francis Smith., De Aar (? July)., ... I feel that the woman's movement is so vast that we all have quite distinct work…

9. To Will Schreiner - on his face haunting her, she knows (that he is dying)
Olive Schreiner BC16/Box7/Fold1/Jan-July1919/
7
<http://www.oliveschreiner.org/vre?view=collections&colid=111&letterid=7>
...My old Brother Your face haunts me. Your dear eyes. My poor old Will. I know, dear. Olive ...

10. To Jan Smuts, on it being his last throw
 Smuts A1/207/185<
http://www.oliveschreiner.org/vre?view=collections&colid=70&letterid=122>
...Jan dear, you are having your last throw; throw it right this time. You are such a wonderfully brilliant ...

Best wishes
Liz and Andrea

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24/12/13post
Lives & Letters Mailing: December 2013

Dear Colleagues

This mailing contains information about:

1. CfPs for 1st Irish Narrative Inquiry Conference (closing date for Abstracts 10 January 2014).

2. 23rd BSA Auto/Biogr​aphy Summer Conference 2014, UK (closing date for Abstracts 31 January 2014)

3. CfPs, Internatio​nal Society for the Empirical Study of Literature and Media 2014 Conference, Turin (closing date 15 January 2014)

With best seasonal wishes,
Andrea


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1. CfPs for Narrative Inquiry Conference (closing date 10 January 2014).

 Jackie O' Toole
 Lecturer in Social Research
 Department of Social Sciences
 IT Sligo
 Tel: 00353719155306
 Email: otoole.jacqueline@itsligo.ie

1st Irish Conference on Narrative Inquiry
Researching and Writing Irish Storyscapes
Sligo Education Centre, Institute of Technology, Sligo, April 10th 2014

CALL FOR PAPERS
We invite papers with an interest in Irish society from a narrative inquiry perspective.
This first national conference on narrative seeks papers from the social sciences in
particular but welcomes papers across the disciplines that have a theoretical,
methodological and/or creative interest in narrative. We welcome papers that
consider narratives of teaching and learning, identity, gender and narrative, narrative
as emancipatory or therapeutic force but novel areas and approaches to narrative
inquiry are also of interest. Hosted by Institute of Technology, Sligo, the
conference is co-organised and supported by National University of Ireland
Galway and National University of Ireland, Maynooth. The conference aims to
bring together a wide range of Irish and international scholars to showcase how
narrative is and can be deployed in researching Irish society.

KEYNOTE SPEAKER
Professor Maria Tamboukou, Professor of Feminist Studies, co-director for the
Centre for Narrative Research and co-editor of the journal Gender and Education,
University of East London, UK. http://www.uel.ac.uk/lss/staff/mariatamboukou/
Professor Tamboukou is a narrative inquiry scholar with an interest in biography, art,
politics, labour and feminism. She is an outstanding contributor, author, teacher and
leader in the field of narrative inquiry whose publications include Women, Education
and the Self (2003), Dangerous Encounters (2003) (edited with S Ball), Nomadic
Narratives, Visual Forces (2010), and Doing Narrative Research (2013) (edited with
M Andrews and C Squire).

PROPOSALS for Papers and Posters welcome (Abstracts of c300 words) by
Friday, January 10th 2014 to Jacqueline O’Toole at otoole.jacqueline@itsligo.ie

Conference Organisers
Dr. Anne Byrne (NUIG) Anne.Byrne@nuigalway
Dr. Grace O’ Grady (NUIM) grace.ogrady@nuim.ie
Jacqueline O’ Toole (IT Sligo) otoole.jacqueline@itsligo.ie  

-----------------

2. 23rd BSA Auto/Biogr​aphy Summer Conference 2014, Oxford.

"People and Places"
23rd BSA Auto/Biography Summer Conference
11 – 13 July 2014
Wolfson College, Oxford

Keynote speaker: Aidan Seery, Trinity College Dublin

Suggestions for the Conference are now welcome. Short abstracts should be sent to Michael Erben (michaelerben@gmail.com). The closing date for abstracts is 31 January 2014, but an early response is recommended. As well as finished papers, work in progress is especially welcome. those wishing to attend the conference but not give a paper are also most welcome.

The total number of places at the conference will be limited to 40. Early booking is strongly advised. Those who wish to indicate their intended attendance at the conference may do so at this stage by email to Michael Erben.

The cost of the conference will be about £325 to cover accommodation and all meals (including the gala dinner). A request for deposit payments will be sent out in February.


-----------------

3. CfPs, Internatio​nal Society for the Empirical Study of Literature and Media 2014 Conference, Turin.

See website:  http://www.igel2014.unito.it/index.php/call-for-papers

 International Society for the Empirical Study of Literature and Media, 2014 Conference, Turin, 20-5 July

 Call for papers

 You are invited to send proposals for conference papers and symposia in the following and related fields:

     Literary reading processes (emotion, cognition, personality, etc.);
     The social role of literature and related media (e.g. film, theatre, Internet, multimedia, virtual reality);
     Educational implications of empirical studies of literature and the media;
     Literature and media from an evolutionary perspective;
     Early literary and media socialization;
     Pedagogical and educational aspects of literature and the media;
     The processes of literary and media production, distribution and reception;
     The role of literary and other cultural institutions: past, present and future;
     The empirical study of historical reception and historical readers;
     Digital methods of research on literature and the media (text analysis, corpus studies, hypertext models, etc.).

 Paper presentations will last 20 minutes, followed by discussion. Symposia consist of a group of papers in one session or in the number of sessions required.

 Proposals should be submitted by January 15th 2014. A decision on acceptance will be provided by March 10th 2014.

 The journals CLCWeb and Versus will devote special issues to our conference. The Journal of Literary Theory is preparing a special issue (Vol. 9, No. 1, 2015) on empirical methods in literary studies.

 Keynote speakers
 Jerôme Bourdon, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
 Art Greasser, Univ. of Memphis, Memphis, TN, U.S.A.
 Arthur Jacobs, Free University, Berlin, Germany
 Elly Konijn, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands 


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23/09/13post
Lives & Letters Mailing: September 2013

Dear Colleagues


This mailing contains information about:


1. a/b: Auto/Biography Studies – Call for Papers, Special essay cluster on ‘Space and Place in Italo/Glaswegian Life Narratives’

2. Doing Narrative Research – Second edition published, and NCRM/CNR/NOVELLA launch event

3. Gender History Network (Edinburgh), Seminar Programme, Semester 1, 2013-14

4. CNR & NOVELLA Graduate Seminar Series 2013-14

5. CALL FOR PAPERS: ESREA – European Society for Research on the Education of Adults - Life History and Biographical Research Network


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1. a/b: Auto/Biography Studies – Call for Papers, Special essay cluster on ‘Space and Place in Italo/Glaswegian Life Narratives’

Call for Papers

Special essay cluster on ‘Space and Place in Italo/Glaswegian Life Narratives’ for a/b: Auto/Biography Studies

Guest editors: Sarah Edwards and Katharine Mitchell, School of Humanities, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK

Glasgow is a world city – the second city of Scotland, the ninth biggest financial centre of Europe, and a major international tourist destination following decades of regeneration, which culminated in its selection as host of the 2014 Commonwealth Games. It is also a multi-cultural city, whose economic and cultural development has been shaped by many immigrant communities, notably the Italo-Scots. Most Italian immigration to the UK took place at the end of the nineteenth century, and the city of Glasgow became the home of the third largest community in the country. While much has been written about Italian migration to America and other Anglophone countries, and there is an increasing body of scholarship on Italo-Scots culture and identity, there is very little work on the developing nature of Glaswegian-Italian identities or their wider impact both on other ethnic and urban cultures, and on forms of life writing.

This special essay cluster seeks submissions which focus specifically on issues of space and place in auto/biographical depictions of the city. There is an increasing amount of work on, for example, urban memory and nostalgia, memorials, the relationships between literary texts and the built environment, urban regeneration and city branding in the fields of  life writing, literary and film studies, diaspora and migration studies, cultural and architectural history, cultural geography and urban studies. This includes a growing body of scholarship on Scottish identities and landscapes in an increasingly devolved and independent state. We invite essays, then, which draw on aspects of this work to consider how Italo-Glaswegian auto/biographical texts both shape, and are shaped by, the literary, cultural, economic and architectural places and spaces of Glasgow.

We are interested in a range of narratives, including autobiographies, memoirs, diaries, television productions, films and internet resources such as blogs, twitterfeeds and oral histories, which explore the concepts of space and place in diverse ways. These might include:

-    the development of Glaswegian identities over successive generations (eg, themes of alienation; a sense of ‘not belonging’ to either country; shifting allegiances during the world wars; changing relationships to concepts of wider Scottish, British and European identities – for example, to the Italian town of Barga, which hosts an annual Scottish fish and chip festival; and relationships to Italian-American identities (as depicted, for example, in Sergio Casci’s 2003 film American Cousins)
-    the shaping of religious identities in a Scottish city divided (both literally, culturally and discursively) by Catholic and Presbyterian sectarianism
-    the role of Italian culture in the urban regeneration of Glasgow during the 1980s and 1990s (for example, accounts of the inception, development and subsequent uses of the Italian Centre in Merchant City)
-    Glaswegian-Italian café culture (in the autobiographies of Joe Pieri; in relation to questions of class and popular stereotypes of Glaswegian-Italian identity as family business owners; as a separatist community; as creators of a new culinary culture)
-    women’s roles in café culture (their familial and business roles; the ‘feminised’ space of the café as a courting zone and as a space for wider community cohesion)

a/b: Auto/Biography Studies (http://abstudies.web.unc.edu/) welcomes submissions of scholarly essays related to all aspects of autobiography and biography studies. We are especially interested in scholarship that crosses disciplinary and genre boundaries, explores new sites and methods of identity construction, and in receiving submissions from the international community of scholars of life narrative. All submitted essays should have a relevant theoretical framework and participate in contemporary conversations within the field of auto/biography studies.

Potential contributors may find it helpful to refer to back issues of a/b: Auto/Biography Studies prior to submitting their work for consideration. Individual articles and full issues are now available on Project MUSE.


Submission guidelines:

Essays should be emailed to sarah.m.edwards@strath.ac.uk and katharine.mitchell@strath.ac.uk by 20 December 2013. We welcome any enquiries from potential authors.

Essays should be between 7,500 and 10,000 words in length, including notes and the Works Cited pages.

All essays must follow the format of the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (7th ed.). The a/b Style Sheet can be found at this address: http://abstudies.web.unc.edu/submissions/
Authors must also include a fifty-word abstract and two to four keywords with their submissions.

In order to ensure a blind peer review, remove any identifying information, including citations that refer to you as the author in the first person. Cite previous publications, etc. with your last name to preserve the blind reading process.

Include your name, address, email, the title of your essay, and your affiliation in a cover letter or cover sheet for your essay. Cover letters may be addressed to the editors, Sarah Edwards and Katharine Mitchell.

Please note that while a/b does make every effort to undertake the peer review process in a timely manner, the process can take between six and eight months.
 
It is the author’s responsibility to secure any necessary copyright permissions and essays may not progress into the publication stage without written proof of right to reprint.


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2. Doing Narrative Research – Second edition published, and NCRM/CNR/NOVELLA launch event

We are very pleased to tell you that the second edition of Doing Narrative Research, including five new chapters and a new Afterword, has been published.

The book can be ordered directly from Sage, with a 20% discount.
http://www.uk.sagepub.com/books/Book238870?siteId=sage-uk&prodTypes=any&q=andrews&fs=1

The discount code, which is valid until December 31st, is UK13EM076

Written by an international team of experts in the field, the second edition of this popular text considers both the theoretical underpinnings and practical applications of narrative research. The authors take the reader from initial decisions about forms of narrative research, through more complex issues of reflexivity, interpretation and the research context. Existing chapters have been updated to reflect changes in the literature and new chapters from eminent narrative scholars in Europe, Australia and the United States have been added on a variety of topics including narratives and embodiment, visual narratives, narratives and storyworlds, new media narratives and Deleuzian perspectives in narrative research.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
List of Contributors
Introduction: What is Narrative Research?Corinne Squire, Molly Andrews and Maria Tamboukou
Chapter 1Narratives of Events: Labovian Narrative Analysis and its Limitations - Wendy Patterson
Chatper 2 From Experience-Centred to Socioculturally-Oriented Approaches to Narrative - Corinne Squire
Chapter 3 Analysing Narrative Contexts -Ann Phoenix
Chapter 4 A Foucauldian Approach to Narratives -  Maria Tamboukou
Chapter 5 Practising a Rhizomatic Perspective in Narrative Research - Gerrit Loots, Kathleen Coppens and Jasmina Sermijn
Chapter 6 Bodies, Embodiment and Stories - Lars-Christer Hydén
Chapter 7 Seeing Narratives -Susan E Bell
Chapter 8 Doing Research 'On and Through' New Media - Mark Davis
Chapter 9 Narrative Approaches to Narrative Worldmaking -David Herman
Chapter 10 Looking Back on Narrative Research: An Exchange - Phillida Salmon and Catherine Kohler Riessman
Chapter 11 Never the Last Word: Revisiting Data - Molly Andrews
Chapter 12 Narrating Sensitive Topics - Margareta Hydén
Chapter 13 The Public Life of Narratives: Ethics, Politics, Methods - Paul Gready
Concluding Comments - Catherine Kohler Riessman
Afterword: The Monkey Wrenches of Narrative- Jens Brockmeier

Doing Narrative Research - 18 October 2013, Institute of Education, London

The National Centre for Research Methods (NCRM) is hosting an 'agenda setting' event, with NOVELLA and  Centre for Narrative Research (CNR), marking the launch of the second edition of Doing Narrative Research, which has been expanded from eight to 13 chapters. Preceding the launch, we have organised a half-day symposium on the theme of 'Narratives of Everyday Life', which will include short presentations from some of the contributing authors of Doing Narrative Research as well as audience-led discussions.

The symposium will be followed by a launch of the book, sponsored by Sage Publications, which will include light food and beverage.

There is no charge for the day, but  a reservation is required. Both events will be held at the Institute of Education in London at the following times.

Symposium: 2-5pm (registration from 1.45pm)
Book Launch: 5.30pm
A detailed programme for the symposium will be available in due course and sent to all delegates ahead of the day.

To book a place please visit our online store<http://store.ioe.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&deptid=112&catid=42&prodid=213>.

We hope you can join us.

Doing Narrative Research 2nd Edition can be ordered directly from Sage, with a 20% discount.
http://www.uk.sagepub.com/books/Book238870?siteId=sage-uk&prodTypes=any&q=andrews&fs=1

The discount code, which is valid until December 31st, is UK13EM076



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3. Gender History Network (Edinburgh), Seminar Programme, Semester 1, 2013-14

Gender History Network (Edinburgh)
Seminar Programme
Semester 1, 2013-14


Wed 11 Sept 2013, 5-6.30pm
Joanna Rostek (Passau University and IASH)
‘Money Matters: Female Economic Authority and Agency in Didactic and Literary Texts by English Women Writers, c. 1815-1835’
Venue: seminar room G.13, William Robertson Wing, Medical School, Doorway 4, Teviot Place.

Wed 18 Sept 2013, 5-6.30pm
Eleanor Gordon (University of Glasgow)
‘Irregular Marriage in Scotland: Official Attitudes and Popular Practice’
Venue: seminar room G.13, William Robertson Wing, Medical School, Doorway 4, Teviot Place.

Wed 23 Oct 2013, 5-6.30pm Work in Progress Seminar
Leanne Dawson (University of Edinburgh)
‘Aimée & Jaguar: Representing Lesbian Desire’
Erla Hallsdorsdottir  (Centre for Research in the Humanities, University of Iceland, and Visiting Scholar, University of Edinburgh)
"A Biography of Her Own. The Historical Narrative and Sigríður Pálsdóttir (1809–1871)".
Venue: seminar room G.13, William Robertson Wing, Medical School, Doorway 4, Teviot Place.

Wed 27 Nov 2013, 5-6.30pm
Amy Tooth Murphy (University of East London)
''The Continuous Thread of Revelation': Chrono-normativity and the Challenge of Queer Oral History'
Venue: seminar room G.13, William Robertson Wing, Medical School, Doorway 4, Teviot Place.

External speakers are sponsored by the School of History, Classics and Archaeology, University of Edinburgh. The seminar organizers are Esther Breitenbach, Louise Jackson, Iida Saarinen, Louise Settle and Alva Traebert. For further information about the Gender History Network (Edinburgh) see:
http://www.shca.ed.ac.uk/Research/networks/gender_history/ or https://www.facebook.com/GenderHistoryNetwork
For campus maps and directions see:
http://www.ed.ac.uk/maps



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4. CNR & NOVELLA Graduate Seminar Series 2013-14

The following Postgraduate seminar series is hosted by the Centre for Narrative Research, UEL, and NOVELLA (Narratives of Everyday Lives and Linked Approaches), Institute of Education.  All seminars are 5.00-6.30 at the Library, Thomas Coram Research Institute, Institute of Education, 27-8 Woburn Square, London
 
The persistence and role of memories of violence in contemporary cultural narratives in Northern Ireland.  15 October 2013, Ronan MacDubhghaill, University of Paris and University of East London
Psychiatric survivors and narratives of activism.  12 November 2013, Jonathan Buhagiar, University of East London
Entanglements of matter and meaning: how Sudanese forced migrants and Cairo make each other.  10 December 2013, Steve Thorpe, University of East London
Religion and clinical psychology: same but different? A narrative account.  14 January 2014, Tim Mason, University of East London
Using narratives in Kiswahili and English to explore the experiences of reintegration of formerly street-connected children in Kenya.  4 February 2014, Su Corcoran, Manchester University
Intimacy narratives of single mothers in the South-East of England. Sussex University  11 March 2014, Charlotte Morris, University of Sussex
Environment as a way into exploring children’s narratives of self and space: emerging analyses from fieldwork in India and the UK.  6 May 2014, Catherine Walker, Institute of Education
Exploring narratives of refugees and Christian social activists. 17 June 2014, Mary Sutton, University of East London
 
To book a place on any of these events or to read more about them, please visit our online store at http://tinyurl.com/og93yx3



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5. CALL FOR PAPERS: ESREA – European Society for Research on the Education of Adults - Life History and Biographical Research Network

The Annual Conference will held in Magdeburg, Germany
at the Otto-von-Guericke-Universität Magdeburg www.ovgu.de
from Thursday 6th to Sunday 9th March 2014

“Before, Beside and After (Beyond) the Biographical Narrative”

Abstracts should be submitted by 31st October 2013 to the conference
organiser at esreabios@ovgu.de
Your paper proposal (preferably a WORD document) should have no more than
500 words and should be in Times New Roman, 12 points.
Your professional / personal data (name, institutional affiliation, phone
and email) should be on a separate page.
Acceptance will be announced by
30th November 2013

Final papers (3000 – 5000 words) should be submitted by email to Rob Evans
at esreabios@ovgu.de by
31st January 2014
Organisation: Rob Evans esreabios@ovgu.de
Conference website: www.esreabios.ovgu.de

Professor Linden West PhD, FRSA.
Director of Research Development
Faculty of Education
Canterbury Christ Church University
Canterbury, CT1 1QU, UK.

Phone (0044) (0) 1227 782732
Email linden.west@canterbury.ac.uk

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01/05/13post
Lives & Letters Mailing: May 2013

Dear Colleagues

This mailing contains information about:

1. A new edited collection, on Documents of Life Revisited

2. Narrative social work: Theory and application by Clive Baldwin

3. Whites Writing Whiteness: Reading Lists now available! http://www.whiteswritingwhiteness.ed.ac.uk/readabout/reading-lists/

Plus a reminder about the Podcast: 'Researching social change and whiteness in South Africa 1770s to 1970s: Methodological beginnings for the Whites Writing Whiteness project' .
http://www.whiteswritingwhiteness.ed.ac.uk/blog/researching-social-change-whiteness-in-south-africa-1770s-1970s/

4. New issue of Narrative Works

5. Travelling Narratives: Modernity and the Spatial Imaginary, International Symposium at the University of Zurich, 29 November -1 December 2013

6. Call for Articles, Modern Life-writing Study

7. Corporate Voices: Institutional and Organisational Oral Histories

8. European Journal of Life Writing

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1. A new edited collection, on Documents of Life Revisited, has been published.

Please visit http://www.ashgate.com/isbn/9781409442899 for more information.

Taking off from Ken Plummer’s work in the original Documents of Life, the contents explore a range of different kinds of life documents and delineate a critical humanist methodology for researching and writing about these - letters, memoirs, ethnographic fieldnotes, photographs, interviews and online sources all feature. Edited by Liz Stanley, University of Edinburgh, there are 14 chapters which provide research-based discussions of exciting new ways of thinking about and analysing documents of life. A flyer to receive 20% off the book’s price is available here, while the Ashgate website also features a price reduction for web orders.

Contents: Preface; Introduction: Introduction: documents of life and critical humanism in a narrative and biographical frame, Liz Stanley; Part I After the Posts: Re-Conceiving Methods and Methodologies: Lies and truths: exploring the lie as a document of life, Clair Morrow; Critical humanist thoughts on the Burnett archive of working class autobiography: ‘Nobody wages war with Dostoevsky or Dickens’, Claire Lynch; The essential subject? The very documented life of Myra Hindley, Helen Pleasance; Whites writing: letters and documents of life in a QLR project, Liz Stanley. Part II On Tellings and Retellings: Analysing Stories, Audiences and Constructed Lives: The diarist’s audience, Sally Fincher; Somebody telling something to someone about something? Stories in Olive Schreiner’s letters and Nella Last’s diary, Andrea Salter; Between diary and memoir: documenting a life in wartime Britain, Cate Watson; Forgotten memories? Silence, reason, truth and the carnival, Heather Blenkinsop; Dear Mrs President: children’s letters to the President of Finland as documents of life, Ulla-Maija Salo. Part III The Ordinary, Virtual, Untimely, Sacred: Critical Humanist Knowledge-Making: Identifying the quotidian in the heterotopic universe of Olive Schreiner’s letters, Helen Dampier; Documents of life and the undead: online postmortem photographs and critical humanist ethics, Sue Wise; Writing water: an untimely academic novella, Mona Livholts; Everything speaks: a multidimensional approach to researching the Lithuanian Jewish past, Shivaun Woolfson. Stories and Storied Lives: a Manifesto: A manifesto for social stories, Ken Plummer; Indexes.

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2.  'Narrative social work: Theory and application' by Clive Baldwin

"A sophisticated yet exceptionally clearly written book. The argument feels highly contemporary, indeed cutting edge, in its call upon constructivist thinking and philosophy." Gavin Bissell, University of Bradford

"Narrative Social Work is a welcoming, lucid introduction to the relevance of different narrative perspectives for understanding social work practices ranging from individual diagnoses to professional ethics and social policy." Arthur W. Frank, University of Calgary

Interest in the contribution narrative can make across many disciplines has been booming in recent years, but its impact in social work has been limited. It has mainly been used in therapeutic intervention such as narrative therapy, social work education or personal accounts. This is the first book to extend the narrative lens to explore the contribution of narrative to social work values and ethics, social policy and our understanding of the self in social, cultural and political context.

The book firstly sets out theoretical concerns and then applies them to specific areas of social work, including child protection, mental health and disability. The author argues that narrative is a richly textured approach to social work that can enhance both theory and practice. As such the book will be of interest to social work students, practitioners and educators, policy makers and those interested in the application of narrative to professional practice.

Clive Baldwin is Canada Research Chair in Narrative Studies in the School of Social Work at St Thomas University, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada and Director of the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research on Narrative. He was formerly Senior Lecturer in Social Work at the University of Bradford, UK. He has published previously on the contribution narrative can make to understanding ethics, dementia, child protection and mental health.

This title can be ordered from the Policy Press website at a 20% discount: http://www.policypress.co.uk/display.asp?K=9781847428257&sf1=keyword&st1=narrative+social+work&m=2&dc=16

Paperback ISBN: 978-1-84742-825-7, £23.99
Hardback ISBN: 978-1-84742-826-4, £65.00

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3. Whites Writing Whiteness: Reading Lists now available!

Introductory reading lists around topics which are key to the Whites Writing Whiteness project are now available at the following link: http://www.whiteswritingwhiteness.ed.ac.uk/readabout/reading-lists/

They include brief annotations of books, articles and chapters which members of the project team have found useful. So far, topics include methodology, letters and epistolarity, frontiers, minerals revolution and 'whiteness'; further lists will be added as the project unfolds.

A quick reminder that a short podcast on 'Researching social change and whiteness in South Africa 1770s to 1970s: Methodological beginnings for the Whites Writing Whiteness project' is now available. It provides an illustrated overview of two connected pieces of work we’ve recently carried out, concerning two very different methodological means of analysing the letters-data that the WWW research is concerned with. Please see the following link:
http://www.whiteswritingwhiteness.ed.ac.uk/blog/researching-social-change-whiteness-in-south-africa-1770s-1970s/

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4. A new issue of Narrative Works is available

Greetings from the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research on Narrative in
Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada!

We're happy to let you know that a new issue of Narrative Works is available.
You may access it here: http://w3.stu.ca/stu/sites/cirn/current_issue.aspx

We encourage you, once on the journal site proper, to register:
http://journals.hil.unb.ca/index.php/NW/user/register. You may access
Narrative Works without doing so, but each registration matters greatly:
we'll be applying for funding in the next round of the Social Sciences and
Humanities Research Council of Canada's Aid to Scholarly Journals
competition, and the more registrations we have, the more likely we are to be
successful. Very little information is required from you, and you may be
assured that we will not use your email address for anything other than
letting you know when an issue has been published.

Thanks, and best wishes,
Beth McKim

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5. Travelling Narratives: Modernity and the Spatial Imaginary
International Symposium at the University of Zurich,
29 November -1 December 2013

Cultures have always been in contact with as well as imagined spaces other
than their own. Ever since the age of discovery, however, the relations, links
and ruptures between different spaces have played an increasingly significant
role in the cultural imaginary, taking on new urgency in today’s world of ever
increasing mobility and global networks.

This three-day symposium hosted by the English Department at the University
of Zurich will focus on spaces in relation, addressing the importance of issues
such as borders and crossings, utopia, travel and exile in the sphere of
cultural production. It aims to explore ways in which spaces are represented
and textually produced, as well as how boundaries between different spaces
are traversed.

The conference is primarily aimed at scholars working in the field of literary
and cultural studies. However, as we believe issues of spatiality can be
fruitfully examined in an interdisciplinary framework we invite contributions
from different segments of the academic community.

Call for papers
We welcome submissions for 20-minute
papers in English that may address, but
need not be limited to, the following areas:
• Space and displacement
• Travel narratives
• Home and exile
• Islands and maritime spaces
• Narrative space
• Liminal spaces and border zones
• Border crossings
• Utopia, heterotopia, dystopia
• Space and vision
• Space and the writing self, space
and autobiography
• Spaces of exchange
• Theories of space and place

Conference fee
The conference fee will be 80 Swiss Francs.

Conference website
http://www.es.uzh.ch/teaching/PhD/phdlit/TravellingNarratives.html

Keynote speakers
Prof. Dr. Tom Conley (Harvard, USA)
Prof. Dr. Andrew Thacker (Leicester, UK)
Dr. Robert T. Tally Jr. (San Marcos, USA)

The conference will be held in cooperation with the international Border
Aesthetics group based at the University of Tromsø (Norway) and the
research group Spaces of Language and Literature from the University of
Tampere (Finland).

Please send an abstract of 200-300 words and a short biographical note to
Johannes Riquet (johannes.riquet@es.uzh.ch) and Elizabeth Kollmann
(elizabeth.kollmann@access.uzh.ch)

Deadline for proposals: 10 July 2013
Johannes Riquet
Elizabeth Kollmann
English Department, University of Zurich

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6. Call for Articles, Modern Life-writing Study

Mission Statement

Life-writing study, which has moved onto the central stage in the academia, gains ever more attention both at home and abroad. The annual journal entitled Modern Life-writing Study intends to fill up the blank in Chinese life-writing studies, provides a venue for scholars both in and outside China, attracts and promotes specialists in the field.

Aiming to stand at the forefront of the academic research for life-writing, Modern Life-writing Study seeks to, in modern visions and views, explore history of life-writing, theories of life-writing and various problems in the life-writing practices. Expanding and enhancing the substance of life-writing studies, and stimulating the discussion of the issues are also its tasks

The journal accepts both Chinese and English submissions. The journal includes but not limits to:

Theory of life-writing, addressing this topic will be included in each issue.

A New History of Life-writing, exploring the important biographers, biographies, or phenomenon of the kind, and offering a survey and correction of crucial historical data.

Criticism of Contemporary Biographers and Practitioners, focusing on the critique of biographers and theorists of life-writing that have been active since 1950s.

Profile, presenting a biographical study of prominent historical figures.

Life-writing Mosaic, providing a genre study and text analysis of various kinds of life-writing, including biography, autobiography, diaries, letters, travel writing, memoirs, oral history, etc.

Biopic, giving a special look at biopics and discussing the works and the theories as well.

Comparative Life-writing Study, concentrating on the study of life-writing and theories from various peoples.

Interviews, presenting talks, conversations with important biographees, biographers, biography or theorists.

Comments, giving a sketch of book reviews, data corrections, facts reaffirmation, and anecdotes.

Institution

The journal is based on the Major Project for China National Social Sciences Fund "Compilation and Research of Overseas Life–writing on Modern Chinese People". The editorial board consists of leading experts, from China and the World, in charge of designing editing principles and other significant policies.

The editorial office locates in the Center for Life-Writing, Shanghai Jiaotong University.

Editor-in-chief: Yang Zhengrun
Deputy Editors-in-chief: Liu Jialin, Yuan Qi
Acting Editor-in-chief: Tang Yuqing
Director of Translation Office: Tang Xiumin

Address:
Modern Life-writing Study
Room 209, Building of Arts and Humanities, 800 Dongchuan, Shanghai, 200240, P.R.China.
Email: sclw209@sina.com
Telephone: +86-21-34204579

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7. Corporate Voices: Institutional and Organisational Oral Histories
The Annual Conference of the Oral History Society in conjunction with the Centre for Life History and Life Writing Research, University of Sussex
Venue: University of Sussex
Date: Friday 5th - Saturday 6th July 2013

FULL DETAILS, PROGRAMME AND BOOKING FORM AVAILABLE AT http://www.ohs.org.uk/conferences/2013.php
See also ohs.org.uk

What is the business of oral history? What is the relationship between oral history and business? Why have institutions and businesses wanted to record their histories? And how have they used their oral history?

This conference opens up our traditional focus on community and domestic lives to explore the hidden histories of private companies and business, public institutions, hospitals, universities, museums, public utilities, local and national governmental, campaigning bodies and charities. We would like to hear about what interviews with those who work in institutions and organisations tell us about organisational history and memory, the institutional or educational community, and more.

This conference would bring into dialogue historians of business, education and health with oral historians who have been commissioned to work with and within institutions to create and document their oral history. We would like to hear from those, too, who work in public history, scholars of business memoir or biography, and, ideally, institutional commissioners or archivists, and interviewees themselves. We also invite honest and practical sharing of experiences of negotiating with private sector funders or large institutions, and of working with those with high public profiles. The conference will additionally encourage discussion of how these experiences relate to working with the media and the general public, which are often part of the package of an institutionally-framed oral history.

Keynotes confirmed include:

Bruce Weindruch (Founder/CEO, History Factory, USA)
Founded in 1979, History Factory is a US-based pioneer of 'heritage management': 'leveraging the collective memory of organizations—the stories told, the words used, and their commonly understood meanings—to help implement strategies and tactics that shape the future.' Working with clients as varied as Subaru, Campbell Soups, Prudential and Whirlpool, History Factory offers a range of products and services from publications and exhibitions to archival services and oral history.

AbdelAziz EzzelArab (American University in Cairo, Egypt)
Professor Abdelaziz Ezzelarab directs the American University in Cairo's Economics and Business History Research Center, whose staff members have interviewed leading figures active in Egyptian business, industry, commerce, and government since the mid-20th century. He will introduce us to a unique oral history archive in Egypt, a land known for its business culture and also one which has been at the forefront of the Arab Spring.

For queries, please contact the conference administrator Belinda Waterman at Belinda@essex.ac.uk

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8. The editors of the free access, peer reviewed e-journal European Journal of Life Writing are very proud to present the second volume of EJLW.

This second volume opens with an introduction to a cluster on 'Life Writing Trajectories in Post-1989 Eastern Europe', initiated by Leena Kurvet-Käosaar and edited by her and Ioana Luca. This cluster is meant  as a first step towards and an invitation to an engaged critical discussion of the numerous life writing trajectories present in post-1989 Eastern Europe. We do invite submissions as well as references to national scholarship in the attempt to make more visible the Eastern European presence in life writing.  The first two published  articles in this cluster have been written by Alfred Hornung and Gabriele Linke

You will find three other articles in this first publication of the second volume : Franziska Gygax’s 'Life Writing on being Ill in Britain and the US' and in the Creative Section:  ‘Hunting Captain Henley’ by Kenneth Pratt, and ‘Absent Without Leave’  by Susan Bradley Smith.

More articles will be added during this calendar year. 

To subscribe, please go to http://ejlw.eu/. For more information, please contact Journal Manager Monica Soeting, m.f.soeting@vu.nl

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14/03/13post
Lives & Letters Mailing: March 2013

Welcome to another Lives & Letters Mailing...

This mailing contains information about:

1. ESRC Whites Writing Whiteness project - major new resource now available!
2. Mass Observing Today - Opportunities for New Research
3. Anniversary of Life Writing - free articles
4. CFP: Private Lives, Intimate Readings - 10-12 June 2013, Estonian Literary Museum, University of Tartu

With best wishes, Andrea

-----------------------
1. The ESRC Whites Writing Whiteness project is pleased to announce a major new resource for site users. From the 'Read About...' page, users can access two new features. These are downloadable copies of WWW publications, and annotated reading lists on key topics, including South African frontiers, the minerals revolution, letters, and a raft of the methodology concerns of the project. Please go to www.whiteswritingwhiteness.ed.ac.uk/

New reading lists will be added in due course - planned lists include whiteness, and the missionary presence. Anything else that comes to mind? Site users are warmly encouraged to contact WWW with ideas for further resources that it would be useful to provide on WWW webpages.

Thanks, Liz

Prof Liz Stanley AcSS, Head of Sociology, Chrystal Macmillan Building, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH8 9LD, UK. See the Olive Schreiner Letters Online at http://www.oliveschreiner.org and the Whites Writing Whiteness project at http://www.whiteswritingwhiteness.ed.ac.uk Sent from my iPad.

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2. Mass Observing Today: Opportunities for new research
16th April 2013, Charity Centre, London

The Mass Observation Project (1981 - on-going) has a long established relationship with its national panel of writers. Academics across a range of disciplines have been commissioning ‘Directive’ questions to this panel since the early 1990s. This event is an opportunity to find out further information about this rich source of qualitative data. Through a series of presentations and a panel session you will hear from previous commissioners, on why they chose to collaborate with the Mass Observation Project, how they have used the responses in their research and their experiences of commissioning Directives.

Speakers include: Professor Carol Smart, Professor Nickie Charles, Dr Nick Hubble. Further details including a programme & information about registering can be found:http://www.massobs.org.uk/events.htm
Registration deadline: 26th March 2013
Please Circulate to your networks.

Best wishes,
Jessica Scantlebury
Jessica Scantlebury,
The Mass Observation Archive,
The Library, University of Sussex,
BN1 9QL, UK
Tel. +44 (0) 1273 678157
j.c.scantlebury@sussex.ac.ukmailto:j.c.scantlebury@sussex.ac.uk
http://www.massobs.org.uk/index.htm
http://twitter.com/MassObsArchive

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3. Happy Birthday Life Writing!

2013 marks the 10th volume anniversary of Life Writing and to celebrate we have put together a collection of FREE articles with every volume represented.

All ten articles have been selected by the editor, Maureen Perkins, to be included in this very special collection.

View the collection:
http://tandf.msgfocus.com/c/1e3Y9LHDJfE98IuINjgNfJavy

Don't forget, you can stay up to date with Life Writing by signing up for table-of-contents alerts:
http://tandf.msgfocus.com/c/1e3YauFSTKr98lIKX39WQ5sHQ.

Kind regards,
Louise Phillips
louise.phillips@tandf.co.uk<mailto:louise.phillips@tandf.co.uk>
Routledge Literature

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4. Call for Papers - Private Lives, Intimate Readings

Estonian Literary Museum,
Institute of Cultural Research and Fine Arts, University of Tartu

11-12 June 2013, Estonian Literary Museum

Keynote speakers: Prof. Jeremy Popkin and Dr. Paul Arthur

It can be argued that critical engagement with the private and the
intimate has always been a key characteristic of life writing studies.
Whether highlighting different contexts and intentions of different
modes and practices of life writing, where what is deeply personal is
also intensely political or focusing on the 'structuring of the
private', life writing studies have made a noteworthy contribution to
contemporary reconceptualizations of the private and the public
spheres. Based on recent development of theoretical perceptions of the
field of life writing, informed by, for example, research into one's
own family history, archival and oral history work as well as
investigation of web-based life writing environments that have created
new sites of interrogation of the private and the public, of the
intimate and the official and formal, the conference aims at
facilitating a discussion of the methodologies of the intimate and the
ethics of the private. Questions to be considered include, but are not
limited to, the following range of issues:

- The founding assumptions that fuel inquiry of an intensely private
and intimate nature, and the transformation of the initial agenda in
the course of the inquiry;
- The relational dynamics of the process, the question of ties built
(and severed) as well as the contexts and media via which they are
facilitated, the interrelationship of private/individual memory and
cultural history;
- Ways of dealing with and interrelating different artefacts of
memory, the process of 'sorting out' (family) memory evidence, the
weight of material evidence, the "concrete reality of a document" (N.
K. Miller, C. Kraus);
- The dynamics of the private and the public in archival and oral
history work and the process of compilation of and publicizing
archival resources;
- The dynamics of private and public documents, the process of
personalization of the public and the official and other acts of
translation (in figurative and literal sense) and interpretation
(concerning, e.g., a range of languages, cultural contexts, time
periods, political regimes, and ideologies);
- Ways of accounting for the absences of concrete realities, the
frequent gap and discord between place as a geographical entity today
and its memorial implications with regard to lost and destroyed
realities (M.Hirsch and L.Spitzer);
- The "intergenerational acts of transfer" (M. Hirsch) such inquiry
often involves on different levels, the second-generation's
responsibilities to its received memories (E. Hoffmann), questions of
postmemory (M. Hirsch) and of post-postmemory;
- The memorial aesthetic and the aesthetic and ethics of
representation of intimate memory, capacities of different
representational modes and artistic media for accounting for the
intimate.

Please send a 300-word abstract and an approx. 200 word bio to Leena Kurvet-Käosaar
(lkk@ut.ee<mailto:lkk@ut.ee>).
Deadline: March 25, 2013.

Leena Kurvet-Käosaar

Assoc. Prof. of Literary Theory,
University of Tartu
Senior Researcher,
Estonian Literary Museum

---
Dr Andrea Salter, Research Fellow, Sociology, School of Social & Political Science, Chrystal Macmillan Building, University of Edinburgh, UK.
http://www.sps.ed.ac.uk/staff/sociology/salter_andrea
http://www.whiteswritingwhiteness.ed.ac.uk
http://www.oliveschreiner.org and http://www.oliveschreinerletters.ed.ac.uk

--
The University of Edinburgh is a charitable body, registered in
Scotland, with registration number SC005336.

back to top

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11/02/13post Lives & Letters Mailing: February 2013

Welcome to another Lives & Letters Mailing. This mailing contains information about:

  1. ‘Diamonds and Gold’ ESRC PhD Studentship. Deadline: 28 February 2013
  2. Oxford Centre for Life-Writing: the Weinrebe Lectures in Life-Writing continue apace...
  3. Seminars at the Centre for Narrative Research, University of East London
  4. Unmasking the Subjects of Literary Biography (Due 2/24/13; SCMLA in New Orleans 10/3-5/13)
  5. Call for Contributors: Dictionary of Caribbean and Afro-Latin American Biography
  6. a/b: Auto/Biography Studies, in collaboration with Guest Editor Paul Arthur of the Australian National University, invite submissions for a special illustrated issue that grows from the 2012 IABA conference, "Framing Lives."
  7. Writing Home: Irish Culture and Wartime Europe, 1938-48; Trinity College Dublin, 13-14 June 2013
  8. European Social Science History Conference (ESSHC), Vienna (Austria) 23-26 April 2014. Oral History and Life Stories Network
  9. LCSS PhD Conference 2013: Methodological Choices and Challenges, Friday, 19th April 2013, King's College London
  10. The Return of Biography: Reassessing Life Stories in Science Studies: A one-day workshop at the Science Museum, London18 July 2013
  11. Nineteenth Century Numbers: British Association for Victorian Studies Annual Conference 2013, 29-31 August 2013, Royal Holloway, University of London CFP
  12. MLA 2014 (Chicago, 9-12 January 2014) Special Session. Situating the Self: Immigrant Auto/biography
--------------------------------------------

1. Diamonds and Gold: ESRC PhD Studentship

A 3 year ESRC funded +3 PhD Studentship is available on ‘Diamonds and gold: Family and other letter-writing in New Rush (later Kimberley) and Johannesburg, South Africa 1868 and after’. The Studentship is attached to the Whites Writing Whiteness project led by Prof Liz Stanley, Sociology, University of Edinburgh. Please see www.whiteswritingwhiteness.ed.ac.uk for more information. Applicants must already have or be in process of completing an ESRC-recognised Research Training Masters degree in Sociology and/or one of its related areas.
Please click here to download a PDF <177kb> with information about the Studentship.
The closing date for applications to be received is 9am Thursday 28 February 2013. Please make sure your application is sent to liz.stanley@ed.ac.uk – thank you!


------------------
2.  Oxford Centre for Life-Writing: the Weinrebe Lectures in Life-Writing continue apace...

Oxford Centre for Life-Writing (OCLW)

www.wolfson.ox.ac.uk/clusters/life-writing

OCLW’s annual Weinrebe series of Lectures in Life-Writing – which, this year, is themed around ‘Life-Writing and Portraiture’ – is continuing apace, after a wonderful event on Tuesday 29 January, in which biographer Paula Byrne launched her new biography of Jane Austen to a packed hall, with a lecture entitled ‘The Real Jane Austen: A Life in Small Things’. This week we are very excited to be welcoming historian Ludmilla Jordanova: Professor Jordanova is Professor of Modern History at King’s College, London, and has written extensively about the history of portraiture in books such as Defining Features: Scientific and Medical Portraits 1660-2000 and The Look of the Past: Visual and Material Evidence in Historical Practice. She will be delivering a lecture on Tuesday 5 February, entitled ‘Traces of Life’ (Haldane Room, Wolfson; 5.30pm). For more information on the Weinrebe Lectures 2013, including historian and biographer Stella Tillyard, please visit www.wolfson.ox.ac.uk/clusters/life-writing

More Events...

After the Weinrebe Lectures have finished, OCLW will host its first practical life-writing workshop, on ‘Shaping the Sources’. This will take place in Wolfson (Haldane Room), on Tuesday 26 February, from 7.30-9.30pm, and will be jointly run by OCLW’s director Hermione Lee, Dr Julie Curtis and Dr Rachel Hewitt. This workshop is now fully booked, but there is still space on our next workshop, on Friday 3 May (on memoir and autobiography). For details, please visit www.wolfson.ox.ac.uk/clusters/life-writing/events/workshops or email rachel.hewitt@wolfson.ox.ac.uk

The Life-Writing Lunch this term will be given by Dr Selina Todd, author of the forthcoming The People: A History of the Working Class in Twentieth Century Britain. This will take place on Tuesday 5 March 2013, 1pm-2pm, in the Haldane Room at Wolfson; a sandwich lunch will be provided. All are welcome, but an RSVP is needed: please email your RSVP with any dietary requirements to rachel.hewitt@wolfson.ox.ac.uk

Our final event this term is a one-day symposium to mark the centenary of the publication of Leonard Woolf’s path-breaking novel, The Village in the Jungle. Registration is now open. For more information, and to register, please visit the symposium webpage (www.wolfson.ox.ac.uk/clusters/life-writing/events/lwoolf) or email the symposium facilitor dominic.davies@st-annes.ox.ac.uk

More Events Elsewhere...

On 4 October 2013, the Oxford University Travel Culture Seminar Series will hold an interdisciplinary conference on ‘Navigating Networks: Women, Travel and Female Communities’. For more information about the conference and the Call for Papers, please visit http://travelcultures.weebly.com/ or email travelculturesseminar@gmail.com

We look forward to seeing you at the Weinrebe Lectures!

With best wishes,

Rachel Hewitt (on behalf of myself, Hermione Lee and Elleke Boehmer)

The Oxford Centre for Life-Writing exists to encourage those who write biography and memoir, and those who undertake research on life-narratives. It is directed by renowned biographer Professor Hermione Lee, co-directed by colonial scholar Professor Elleke Boehmer, and administered by Research Fellow and literary historian Dr Rachel Hewitt. OCLW is based at Wolfson College, Oxford. Through events and a dynamic virtual presence, we aim to bring together scholars, students and practitioners, nationally and internationally, within and outside academia, who share an interest in life-writing. For more information, see our website (www.wolfson.ox.ac.uk/clusters/life-writing) or email rachel.hewitt@wolfson.ox.ac.uk. You are on this mailing list because you have requested it, or because you have attended one of our events in the past. To unsubscribe, please send an email to rachel.hewitt@wolfson.ox.ac.uk with ‘UNSUBSCRIBE’ as the subject.

Dr. Rachel Hewitt,

Weinrebe Fellow in Life-Writing and Leverhulme Early Career Research Fellow,

Wolfson College,

University of Oxford. OX2 6UD

rachel.hewitt@wolfson.ox.ac.uk



------------------
3. Seminars at the Centre for Narrative Research, University of East London

CENTRE FOR NARRATIVE RESEARCH
RESEARCH SEMINAR PROGRAMME
University of East London,
Docklands Campus, East Building
Tuesdays, 12:00 - 1:00 pm
 
12 February 2013
Olga Marti-Ortega, UEL,
The memory of the grandchildren: impunity and justice in Spain,
Room: EB.1.45
12 March 2013
Ann Phoenix, Institute of Education, Narrative transformations over time: Adult reconceptualization of non-normative childhood,
Room: EB.1.45
16 April 2013
Robert Ahearne, UEL,
‘We Would Rather Be Exploited Than Ignored’: Life Narratives of Intervention in Southern Tanzania
 
GRADUATE SEMINARS
The Centre for Narrative Research
And NOVELLA
(ESRC Research Methods Node)
Tuesdays, 5.00 – 6.30 pm
Thomas Coram Research Unit,
27-8 Woburn Square,
London WC1H OAA
Room: Thomas Coram Research Unit Library, NOVELLA,
Institute of Education
 
12 February 2013
Tracy Part, Manchester Metropolitan University,
Narratives of adult mathematics learners
12 March 2013
Stephanie Baum, NOVELLA,
Institute of Education,
Men’s domestic cooking careers over the life course
16 April 2013
Joe Winter, NOVELLA,
Institute of Education,
Narratives of ‘parenting’ in online forums
4 June 2013
Bahar Taseli, CNR, UEL,
Narratives of Self and other in the Turkish Cypriot print media

See: http://www.uel.ac.uk/cnr/

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4. Unmasking the subjects of literary biography (Due 2/24/13; SCMLA in New Orleans 10/3-5/13)
 
Proposed Special Session for the SCMLA Conference in New Orleans, October 3-5, 2013.
This panel seeks to explore the ways literary biographers approach their subjects, namely authors who themselves adopted a variety of masks in their writings. How do biographers use their subjects’ fictional or poetical works without reading too much into them? How do biographers use writers’ nonfictional accounts without taking them at face value? How do biographers negotiate the various warnings against reading biographically while still finding value in the relationship between the author’s life and the works? These are just some of the issues that presenters may wish to address. Papers may be written from the perspective of the biographer or from the reader analyzing biography. Please send your proposals (1-page with brief CV) and/or queries to Anne Boyd Rioux at
aeboyd@uno.edu by February 24, 2013.

------------------
5. Call for Contributors: Dictionary of Caribbean and Afro-Latin American Biography.

Oxford University Press and the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research at Harvard University are pleased to announce a call for contributors to the Dictionary of Caribbean and Afro-Latin American Biography (DCALAB). We hope to enlist the broad community of scholars in Latin American, Caribbean, and African Diaspora studies as we complete this major and unprecedented research project.

Launched in 2012, the DCALAB follows in the tradition of the award winning African American National Biography (OUP, 2008) and Dictionary of African Biography (OUP, 2011), and with them will constitute the largest biographical dictionary of the African diaspora to date.

The Editors-in-Chief of the project are Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Director of the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research at Harvard University, and Franklin W. Knight, Leonard and Helen R. Stulman Professor of History at Johns Hopkins. Professors Gates and Knight will be assisted by 15 leading academics with expertise in the distinct national and regional histories of the Caribbean and Latin America.

The initial print edition of the DCALAB, scheduled for publication in 2014 will include 2,000 entries in six volumes. We have assigned more than 800 entries to 350 scholars and a further 200 entries are invited pending acceptance as of February 2013.

We encourage members of the Latin American, Caribbean, and African Diaspora Studies communities to consult our list of 1000 available entries and to indicate those you are interested in writing. The list is arranged by country on our website and will be updated regularly.

https://sites.google.com/a/oup.com/reference/Home/dcalab/list-of-entries

All entries must be submitted by December 1, 2013, at the latest. Entries range from 500-2500 words and come with an honorarium of 10 cents per word (in OUP product) or 5 cents per word by check. We encourage those scholars submitting in a language other than English to include a translation into English, if possible

Please submit an academic resume and a brief (5-page) writing sample to sjniven@fas.harvard.edu if you are interested in applying for an entry. All assignments will be at the discretion of the editors.

Sincerely.

Steven Niven, Executive Editor, Dictionary of Caribbean and Afro-Latin American Biography,
W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African & African American Research, Harvard University

Jenny Keegan, Assistant Editor, Dictionary of Caribbean and Afro-Latin American Biography,
Oxford University Press

------------------
6. The editors of a/b: Auto/Biography Studies, in collaboration with Guest Editor Paul Arthur of the Australian National University, invite submissions for a special illustrated issue that grows from the 2012 IABA conference, "Framing Lives."

All submitted essays should have a relevant theoretical framework and participate in contemporary conversations within the field of auto/biography studies. The editors welcome essays that explore visual narratives in diverse forms, including, but not limited to, the following
topics:

Visual culture and visual rhetorics
Drawn, painted, photographed, sculpted, and stitched narratives Graphic novels, artist books, illustration, and illustrated narratives
The praxis of image and narrative
Televised, filmed, and digitized life narratives
Web 2.0, websites, blogs, RPGs, Social networking sites, and other forms of new media
Archives, archival work, and digital archives
Museum studies, exhibitions, and the ethics of exhibiting
Performance, performing, and performative narratives
Spectacle, the viewer, viewing, and the gaze
The Other and other-ing through visual representation
Visualizing Colonialism and Post-Colonialism
The racialization or gendering of visual narratives
The new spaces and places of autobiographical narratives

Essays not published in the special issue may be considered as general submissions to a/b.

For the complete CFP, please visit our website:
https://abstudies.web.unc.edu/projects/

All inquires and submissions should be sent to Ricia Anne Chansky at
ricia.chansky@upr.edu. Please attach submissions as word documents to your email.

Submissions will be accepted through March 15, 2013.


------------------
7. Writing Home: Irish Culture and Wartime Europe, 1938-48
Trinity College Dublin, 13-14 June 2013


Call for papers

If Europe, as Dan Diner has written, ‘seems more and more to be finding a common unifying memory in the events of World War II’, then what are the cultural consequences of this dynamic process for Ireland?

The decade between 1938 and 1948 was a time of immense revolutionary upheaval across Europe, but tends to have been characterised as a time of stagnation and isolation for Ireland. During these years, however, many Irish writers and artists travelled extensively across the continent, whilst several of their European counterparts arrived in Ireland. Taking these migrations as a starting point, this symposium will examine afresh the history of this decade and its impact on Irish cultural memory. Writers under consideration may include, but are by no means limited to: Samuel Beckett, John Betjeman, Christabel Bielenberg, Hubert Butler, John Hewitt, Denis Johnston, Thomas McGreevy, Brian Moore, Francis Stuart, and Rebecca West.

As cultural memory is mediated through a wide variety of discourses and artefacts, from literature to visual art, architecture, film, music and journalism, we welcome interdisciplinary participation from the fields of modern languages and literature, media studies, history and history of art. Possible topics include but are not limited to:

Memory, migration and identity
Art as a memory trigger
War reportage
Cultural communities
Emigrés and refugees
Life writing
The visual arts and architecture
Allegiances and affiliations
Censorship
Secret histories
Diaspora
Collaboration
Forgotten writers and artists
Documents and archives

We invite abstracts for papers of twenty minutes duration, and also invite proposals for panels that provide a platform for innovative or challenging approaches to these issues. We particularly welcome proposals from early career academics and graduate students.

Please send a 250-word abstract with a brief biographical note to Dorothea Depner and Guy Woodward at
writinghome2013@gmail.com by 10 March 2013.

http://writinghome2013.blogspot.ie/


------------------
8. European Social Science History Conference (ESSHC), Vienna (Austria) 23-26 April 2014.
Oral History and Life Stories Network

Memory, Narrative, History: The Network brings together oral historians and life story practitioners who use oral histories to explore memory, narrative and history.
2014 Theme: Crises and ruptures in memory and narrative
The Oral History and Life Stories Network has become the major regular international forum for European oral history and life story researchers.

The European Social Science History Conference has been held biannually since 1996 and the Oral History and Life Stories network has met at each conference since 1998. Oral History and Life Stories is currently one of the largest, friendliest and most popular networks of the European Social Science Conference.

We invite proposals for the Vienna ESSHC-conference on 23-26 April 2014 both for individual papers and for sessions. Sessions can have various formats: panels, round table discussions, presentations in other media followed by discussion.

We invite contributions discussing conceptual and methodological issues related to the representation of crises and ruptures (private, public, personal and/or political) in oral history with specific reference to memory and narrative. We welcome contributions from both oral historians and life story practitioners but with the focus on oral testimonies.

We are especially encouraging contributions addressing disrupted memories and silences. This might be with reference to place or to the relationship between the local and global and/or between individual and social memory. We would hope for analyses of positive as well as negative impacts of crises and ruptures.

We would welcome proposals addressing the following issues:

• Ruptures and Crises: Making sense of the past or rewriting history?

• Rupture, repressed memories and trauma

• Crises and positive changes in re/constructing identities

• Breaking with the past and reshaping memory

• Narratives and memories of globalization and resistance

• Transnational and national narratives of Europe

• (Re)presenting selves and others: multiculturalism, crises and memory

• ‘Composure’ and ‘discomposure’ in the construction of narratives


In addition we would also like to see presentations that:

· Explore methodological changes and challenges for working and researching with oral history in different disciplinary fields

· Address challenges facing the oral history method; including how attitudes to interviewing and being interviewed have changed; new ways of analyzing interviews; as well as approaches to archiving

· Compare written texts with oral sources in relation to the themes listed above

· Discuss the social function of oral history archives in relation to crises and historical disruption (including re-use of interviews produced by earlier projects)

· Explore emotions, sensory and embodied memories in relation to the themes above.

Finally, we would like to encourage specific panels on oral history and its use in education, and on research combining oral history and audio-visual research (again with reference to this year’s theme of rupture and crises).

Please send your proposals to Graham Smith, Andrea Strutz and Timothy Ashplant. Upon submission you must also pre-register on the conference website
http://www.iisg.nl/esshc/2012/index.php where more general conference information is available. Panel proposals should be submitted by the intended chair(s) of the panel, and include details of each of the papers proposed. The deadline for sending your abstract is May 15, 2013.

2014 Oral History and Life Stories Network Chairs: Chairs: Graham Smith (
Graham.Smith@rhul.ac.uk) Andrea Strutz (andrea.strutz@uni-graz.at), Timothy Ashplant (T.G.Ashplant@livjm.ac.uk
)

2014 Oral History and Life Stories Network Advisory Panel: Helga Amesberger, Joanna Bornat, Gerhard Botz< Brigitte Halbmayr, Ela Hornung, Bea Lewkowicz, Albert Lichtblau, Alexander von Plato, Sandro Portelli, Penny Summerfield, Miroslav Vanek.

All the best

Graham

Dr Graham Smith
Senior Lecturer
Department of History
Royal Holloway
University of London


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9. LCSS PhD Conference 2013:

Methodological Choices and Challenges

Date: Friday, 19th April 2013
Venue: King's College London

Keynote Speakers:
Prof Penny Green, King's College London (KCL), The Dickson Poon School of Law
Prof Kenneth Benoit, London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE),
Head of the Department of Methodology

Call for Proposals:

Abstract submission Deadline: Friday, 15th March 2013

LCSS PhD Conference 2013 on Methodological Choices and Challenges provides an
opportunity for current PhD students and recent graduates from all social
science disciplines to share their research methodologies and the challenges
they encountered in every step of their research. The aim is to provide the
opportunity for PhD students to debate and reflect on their methodological
choices, and to consider alternative methods, approaches tools and sources.
We encourage submissions on both qualitative and quantitative research
methods, on interdisciplinary approaches and on innovative research
methodologies. We also welcome papers that address the relationship between
research and policy. Papers are required to present a methodological issue
within the context of a substantive research project.

We invite contributors to address one or more of the following topics and
discuss these in relation to their own research:

* Methodological choices: What are the challenges in choosing
appropriate research methodologies? How do methodological choices influence
formulation of the research question and research design? What are the key
challenges in identifying the type of research methodology and what are the
ways of overcoming these challenges?
* Types of methodology: What are the advantages and disadvantages of
quantitative and qualitative methods in a range of disciplinary contexts? In
what type of research settings do these types of methodological tools provide
most useful outcomes?
* Methodological dominance: What is the dominant methodology adopted in
your field and in the study of specific cases? Is there scope for considering
the introduction of new methodologies in your field?
* Fieldwork: What aspects of social sciences research require
fieldwork? What are/were the important issues to consider when preparing for
fieldwork?
* Data collection and being in the field: What are the key challenges
in undertaking fieldwork in relation to data collection? What types of data
collection methods are appropriate for specific research topics?
* Data analysis: What is the relation between specific types of data
and analysis? How is it possible to ensure that outcome of data analysis
support research hypothesis?
* Ethical issues: What are the types of ethical issues involved in
specific research methodologies? What ethical issues are important to
consider when adopting specific research methodologies?
* Presentation of research outcomes: What are the ways of facilitating
implementation of research outcomes in the wider literature and among
policy-makers? How can you ensure that your research reaches the wider
public? What strategies have you employed; and what challenges face creating
'impact'?

Abstract submission deadline: Friday, 15th March 2013

Please click here to submit a proposal for the conference
<https://www.easychair.org/account/signin.cgi?conf=lcssphdconf2013>

Advisory Committee:

Prof Penny Green, King's College London, The Dickson Poon School of Law
Prof Kenneth Benoit, London School of Economics and Political Sciences, Head
of the Department of Methodology
Prof Benjamin Bowling, King's College London, The Dickson Poon School of Law
Prof Lucinda Platt, Institute of Education, University of London
Prof Peter Lieven, King's College London, War Studies Department
Dr Fahri Karakas, University of East Anglia, Norwich Business School, London
Centre for Social Studies
Dr Raya Kardasheva, King's College London, Department of European &
International Studies
Dr Zeynep Kaya, London School of Economics, Department of International
Relations, London Centre for Social Studies
Dr Shaminder Takhar, London South Bank University, Department of Social
Sciences
Dr Zeynep Engin, London Centre for Social Studies, Executive Director
Dr Claudia Aradau, King's College London, War Studies Department
Dr Sevket Hylton Akyildiz, School of Oriental and African Studies, University
of London
Dr Kriti Kapila, King's College London, King's India Institute
Dr Humeria Iqtidar, King's College London, Department of Political Economy
Dr Zerrin Ozlem Biner, University of Cambridge, Max Planck Institute for
Social Anthropology
Dr Fabian Zhilla, King's College London, The Dickson Poon School of Law

Conference Coordinator:

Ms Ferya Tas, King's College London (KCL), London Centre for Social Studies
(LCSS)

The final program for the conference will include keynote speeches and
special professional development workshops alongside with a number of PhD
panels and poster presentations. Submissions should take the form of an
abstract of no more than 350 words, outlining your study and the
methodological issue(s) you address. You should also submit a short
biography.

Prizes will be awarded for the best paper and poster presentations.

We thank The Dickson Poon School of Law, King's College London for their
contributions to this conference.

Please send any enquiries to the conference administrator, Mr Ozdemir Ahmet,
at o.ahmet@socialstudies.org.uk

Conference Participation Fee: £25


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10. The Return of Biography: Reassessing Life Stories in Science Studies
 
A one-day workshop at the Science Museum, London18 July 2013
 
Call for papers
 
To coincide with the close of the biographical exhibition Codebreaker: Alan Turing's Life and Legacy, the Science Museum invites participation in a one-day workshop on the role of biography in science studies.
 
The lived life serves as an organising principle across disciplines. We talk of the biographies of things and places, and we use personal narratives to give shape to history. Biography is central to historians' work but often unacknowledged and untheorised: it is used to inspire and to set examples, and to order our thinking about the world, but is a primarily a literary mode; biographies written for popular audiences provide material for the most abstruse work across disciplines; and the canon of well-known lives dictates fashions in research.
 
For historians of science, technology and medicine this is a particularly pressing issue: their discipline is founded on the 'great men' account of discovery and advance, and, though that has long since been discarded, the role of the individual in historical narratives has not diminished, and heroic tales have themselves become a legitimate subject of inquiry. For writers and researchers in other fields, the question remains: how do the lives of individuals intersect with cultural trends and collective enterprise?
We invite contributions on, but not limited to, the following:
 
-         Literary techniques in biographical narrative
-         Non-human biographies (buildings, objects, ideas)
-         Autobiography
-         Fictional biography
-         The importance of scientific heroes in science communication
-         The role of biography in collaborative and 'big' science
-         Biographies as archetypes: the life scientific
-         Discontinuities in working and intellectual lives
-         The role of 'industries' (Darwin, Newton etc)
-         The relation of named archives to historical projects
 
Deadline for proposals: 31 January 2013.
 
Please submit an abstract of no more than 300 words, for a talk of 20 minutes, as an e-mail attachment along with your name, institutional affiliation and email address to research@sciencemuseum.ac.uk. All enquiries should also be sent to this address.
 
Organiser: Dr Boris Jardine (Science Museum, Curator of History of Science)
Commentator: Prof. Ludmilla Jordanova (Chair in Modern History, King’s College London)
Date: 18 July 2013
Location: The Science Museum, London

Website: http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/about_us/research/return_of_biography.aspx

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11. Nineteenth Century Numbers: British Association for Victorian Studies Annual Conference 2013
 
29-31 August 2013, Royal Holloway, University of London
 
The BAVS conference 2013 will be held at Royal Holloway, University of London which was founded by the Victorian entrepreneur and philanthropist Thomas Holloway at Egham, Surrey in 1886. The College and the nearby former Holloway Sanatorium are products of surplus wealth accumulated in the course of Holloway’s activities as financier, in the large-scale manufacture of patent medicines, and in mass marketing – including advertising to Britain’s overseas colonies. While its theme reflects these institutional origins, the Conference aims to explore the relevance of numbers to nineteenth-century studies in a wide variety of ways. We welcome proposals for papers and panels which speak to the interdisciplinary conference theme broadly and innovatively.
 
Call for Papers
 
Mass culture, mass politics and reform; crowds, population, over population; Malthus and Darwin; proliferation and extinction; the residuum and the best circles.
 
Collecting and cataloguing; replication; periodicals and serials; prosody and metre; music and rhythm; architecture and proportion; sequence and sequels.
 
Mathematics; statistics; geometry; time and technology; timetables and navigation; mass mobility; computation; money; finance and economics.
 
The one and the many; duration; the infinite; age and aging.
 
Research methodologies in the digital era; quantitative and qualitative; corpus linguistics; periodization; information overload.
 
Deadline for abstracts: 28th March 2013. Please submit all abstracts to bavs2013@gmail.com. Enquiries about proposing themed panels can be sent to ruth.livesey@rhul.ac.uk or juliet.john@rhul.ac.uk.
 
For further details, please see: http://bavs2013.wordpress.com and http://www.bavsuk.org/events.htm
.

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12. MLA 2014 (Chicago, 9-12 January 2014) Special Session: Situating the Self: Immigrant Auto/biography 
 
This panel seeks papers which investigate the various ways auto/biography might allow the immigrant subject to negotiate the gendered and religious contexts which shift – often dramatically – with movement from one national and social space to another. How does the immigrant auto/biographer use narrative to situate him or herself in such fluid settings? How is narrativization of a life story a useful tool for adapting to new environments?
We welcome approaches from various disciplines across the humanities and social sciences, as well as interdisciplinary approaches which combine methodologies from two or more disciplines to open innovative and creative pathways of analysis.
Please send a 250-word abstract and 50-word bio to: 7af15@queensu.caand 11sg28@queensu.caby 15 March 2013.


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19/10/12post
ESRC 3 year PhD Studentship, Edinburgh Sociology, Whites Writing Whiteness

**INFORMATION UPDATED ON 11 FEBRUARY 2013** (available to download as a PDF here)

Diamonds and Gold: Family and other letter-writing in New Rush (later Kimberley) and Johannesburg, South Africa 1868 and after

ESRC PhD Studentship

A sociologist or working elsewhere in the social sciences? Interested in how society is organised and how particular societies change over time? Also interested in social hierarchies and inequalities, how these come into being, and take different shape in different contexts? An ESRC funded Studentship concerned with these key questions and issues of central concern for social science is available.

A 3 year ESRC funded +3 PhD Studentship is available on ‘Diamonds and gold: Family and other letter-writing in New Rush (later Kimberley) and Johannesburg, South Africa 1868 and after’. The Studentship is attached to the Whites Writing Whiteness project led by Prof Liz Stanley, Sociology, University of Edinburgh. Applicants should already have, or else be in process of completing, an ESRC-recognised Research Training Masters degree in Sociology or one of its related areas.

The Whites Writing Whiteness Project and the +3 ESRC PhD Studentship

The occurrence of rapid and profound social, economic and political change in South Africa in a relatively short time-period enables absolutely fundamental sociological questions about social change, imperialism, colonialism, local forms of capitalism, class, labour, gender and ‘race’ to be explored. It is a truism that sociology came into existence to investigate and understand the processes of social change. While terms such as globalisation, late modernity and postmodernity operate something of a closure on the ‘what’ of social change, the Whites Writing Whiteness (www.whiteswritingwhiteness.ed.ac.uk) project is concerned with the ‘how’ of what happened, where and when it happened, and how people wrote about this from within the ferment of change occurring.

Consequently the Whites Writing Whiteness project is exploring how change occurred more generally in South Africa over the 200 year period from the 1770s to the 1970s. The PhD Studentship will be concerned with researching one particular – and especially important – aspect of this – diamonds and gold!

When first diamonds in the 1860s in New Rush and then gold in the 1880s on the Witwatersrand were discovered, what has been referred to as a ‘mineral revolution’ occurred. Erupting into the midst of a largely pastoral economy, highly capital intensive economic developments took place in what rapidly become enclave economies centring on these two places. The availability of paid work attracted a migrant black labour force wanting to purchase specific kinds of goods and so working away from home for short-run periods of time; and the increasingly intensive use of labour, with technological and organisational developments leading to workers living in compounds and the confinement and close regulation of labour. Huge numbers of white miners (and initially black miners too, until they were excluded) were attracted from many different parts of the world, and also from within southern Africa.

Soon the quintessentially modern cities of Kimberly and Johannesburg mushroomed, characterised by mobilities, the comings and goings of diverse people from many different parts of the world including different parts of southern Africa, and flows of money including in international transfers to European money markers, and they also experienced equally rapid growth of populations.  Most people – white as much as black – who were living there were migrants from an ‘elsewhere’ that could be southern Africa, St Petersburg, Dundee, New Zealand, California, Manchester and many many other places. The need to keep in touch with family and friends, also to make and seal business transactions, issue promissory notes and a wide variety of other everyday forms of letter-writing, expanded as the population did so. Often aware of the extraordinary events unfolding, people’s different kinds of letter-writing could sometimes go hand-in-hand with writing a diary or journal, penning maps and plans, sending postcards, painting or sketching, photography…

It is a truism that the character of ‘race’ as it became under the rigidities and binary hierarchies of apartheid and as it presently exists in post-transition South Africa was slowly and piecemeal constructed from what had in an earlier period been the much freer interrelationships of whites and black people. The above changes set in motion by the mineral revolution played a part in this, by positioning first black men as labour ‘hands’ and then black women as also labouring ‘hands’ and subsequently as also suppliers of (often covert) sexual services.

But how did these changes take place, and how did the people living through them comment on them as they were happening? Was it as straightforward as the truisms suggest, or were ethnicity, gender and class also at work in giving particular meanings to ‘race’ as skin-colour? Did all people of European descent share the same kinds of views about ethnicity, ‘race’ and hierarchy or where there important differences about this? How did gender map onto ideas about ‘race’ and separate spheres?

Also, how did this change over time, from the 1860s and 70s, through the South African War of 1899 to 1902and its aftermath, through Union on 1910, through the 1920s and the rise of the National Party, through the 1930s and the Afrikaner Broederbond’s links with Nazi Germany, through the 1948 National Party election victory and subsequent rapid institutionalisation of apartheid, through to 1960 and Sharpeville and ensuing states of emergency, through the 1980s period of transition to the 1994 democratic elections and the ANC Government. How was the occurrence of these changes experienced at local levels, by people living and working in Kimberley and Johannesburg? And was it the same or different in these two cities?

The focus for exploring these things is the minority white population, and how whiteness and its ‘Others’ was represented in their ordinary everyday writings, in personal, family, friendship, business and other kinds of letter-writing. How did differently situated white people understand and represent the increasingly racially binary social, economic and political circumstances they lived in? Exploring this via family collections (rather than organisations or businesses) puts emphasis on the everyday and ordinary, and, because many such collections span three, four or more generations, it also enables changes over time to be explored.

The Studentship Research

The Studentship-holder will research the extensive and extremely rich South African archive collections that exist regarding Kimberley and Johannesburg as enclave economies which mushroomed and became commanding presences shaping the South African economy and the dynamics of its internal labour market. These collections include letters and personal papers, diaries, journals and memoirs, and also company records and related documents.

Investigating these sources will enable the construction and complexities of the racial order and how it changed over time to be explored at close detail. The focus of the Studentship research will be on how whiteness and related ethnic and racial categories are represented in people’s letter-writing and changes in this over time and how this affected not only labour markets but also relationships between groups of people. The research will cover the period from mineral discoveries up to and key political events in 1948 and the institutionalisation of apartheid. However, the final cut-off point could certainly be beyond this date, depending on the Studentship-holder’s particular interests. The wider project encompasses the years of Sharpeville and the Soweto uprising and so runs through to the 1970s.

The exact choice of collections for research will depend on the Studentship-holder’s particular interests, and also of course what they discover as their research unfolds. However, fieldwork will be carried out on relevant South African collections, and in particular those held in:

  • the Kimberley Africana Library
  • the Cullen Library at the University of Witwatersrand (nb. many of the inventories for its collections are available online)
  • the Johannesburg Public Library Harold Strange Africana Collection

Please note that there will be two required periods of extended (each of around 6 to 8 weeks) archival fieldwork on selected collections in the Kimberley and Johannesburg archives noted above, with funding for these fieldwork periods built into the Studentship.

Studentship Requirements

Applicants must already have, or else be in the process of completing, an ESRC-recognised Research Training Masters degree in Sociology and/or one of its related areas, such as social and cultural history, social and cultural geography, political studies etc.

Please note that only UK citizens and EU citizens with full residency are eligible to hold ESRC Studentships. Also the broad topic area of the Studentship around documentary sources regarding the occurrence and effects of the so-called ‘mineral revolution’ starting in  Kimberley and Johannesburg, and concerned with reconfigurations of ‘race’, is non-negotiable. However, the Studentship-holder’s particular interests can also be incorporated in the research design.

The PhD Studentship-holder will, if needed, receive additional training in archival research, as well as specific training in use of the Project’s Virtual Research Environment (see the Whites Writing Whiteness project’s webpages at www.whiteswritingwhiteness.ed.ac.uk for further information). Practical methodology in the field will involve designing a framework for selecting materials from the large archive collections being worked on, gaining proficiency in producing detailed and accurate transcriptions, and contributing to the Project’s publications and other activities.

Outline Timetable for the Studentship
 Year 1 – Any additional training, library-based research, first South African fieldwork period, literature and methodology draft chapters;
Year 2 – second South African fieldwork period, draft chapters on South African research; preliminary analysis of collections data.
Year 3 – complete collections data analysis and draft chapters; finalise and submit thesis.
 
Inquiries and Applications
For inquiries about the ESRC Studentship, please contact Prof Liz Stanley as soon as possible by emailing liz.stanley@ed.ac.uk and, if necessary, an email can later be followed by a phone conversation.
In order to apply for the Studentship, please send the following to Liz by email and file-attachment by the closing date:
  • A letter of application explaining why you are interested in carrying out the research programme involved and how your qualifications and interests fit the specification for the Studentship.
  • Your contact information: postal address, phone number and email address. Please make sure a phone number is provided, to contact you should you be shortlisted; thank you.
  • A CV, which should set out your academic achievements to date as well as other relevant experience and qualifications.
  • The names, academic positions, work addresses and also the email addresses of two referees who are able to comment on your academic performance (including in your ESRC-recognised Research Training Masters degree if you already have this).
  • A pdf or Word file of your Masters dissertation if you already have an MRes or similar research Masters.
  • A draft research outline for how you would like to put the Studentship research as outlined above into practice. This must be no longer than 4 typed A4 pages in Times New Roman font size 12 single-line spacing. Please organise your proposal under the following headings, all four of which should be used, although in an order and to a length which best fits how you see your particular approach to the Studentship research being shaped.
(i) Outline what you see as the key relevant theory and research: what combination of work on archive research, historical sociology, letter-writing, social change, imperialism, South Africa in transition, the racial and gender order and so on, would you propose to draw on? and which approaches or theoretical ideas from this you are most interested in? This is to show how you relate to the relevant key literature/s.
(ii) Discuss what themes, issues and questions you think it would be useful to explore in carrying out this research. This is to show what particular research questions and ideas you would like to take forward and what your broad methodology or perspective is.
(iii) The Studentship research will be both substantive and theoretical, and the basic method will be using documentary methods to analyse the archival documentary sources you will be working with. Within this framework, how will you analyse these documents to explore issues about change and the racial order? This is to show how you think it would be most helpful to operationalize the analysis of archival and documentary sources and data.
(iv) Indicate any ethical issues you think might arise from the research (ethics can be interpreted in a broad sense, for instance regarding legitimacy and responsibility, as well as more narrowly, for example concerning matters of access and consent).

Closing Date, Interviews

The closing date for proposals and applications to be received is 28 February 2013. Please make sure your proposal etc is sent to liz.stanley@ed.ac.uk – thank you! A short informal interview may be held as appropriate.
The person who is awarded the Studentship will then be required (if they haven’t already) to make an immediate application for a place in the Graduate School of Social and Political Science/Sociology, and also for the ESRC Studentship (nb. these will be formalities for the successful applicant). However, the Studentship has already been awarded to the project, so the award will be certain once the formalities are completed.
The Studentship will commence at the start of the University of Edinburgh academic year, on 9 September 2013.
Applicants must already have an ESRC-recognised Research Training Masters degree in Sociology and/or one of its cognate areas, such as social and cultural history, social geography, political studies etc. Please note that only UK citizens and EU citizens with full residency are eligible to hold ESRC Studentships, and that the topic area of the Studentship is non-negotiable.
 
Reading List
 
For those presently unfamiliar with this field of research, some useful beginning sources are as follows:
 
Background reading
 
Richard Elphick & Hermann Giliomee (eds 1988) The Shaping of South African Society, 1652-1840 Middletown, Con: Wesleyan University Press. (This covers economy and society in the period before the mineral revolution.)
 
Rodney Davenport & Christopher Saunders (5th edition 2000, or later) South Africa: A Modern History Basingstoke: Macmillan (for broad reference purposes)
 
Alan Lester, Etienne Nel & Tony Binns (2000) South Africa Past, Present and Future Harlow: Pearson Education (Introduction, Conclusion, but overall an important starting point)
 
 
Kimberley and Johannesburg, Labour & the ‘Mineral Revolution’
 
Jonathan Crush, Alan Jeeves & David Yudelman (1991) South Africa’s Labor Empire Boulder, Col:  Westview Press. (on migrant labour on the Rand)
 
Duncan Innes (1984) Anglo American and the Rose of Modern South Africa New York: Monthly Review Press (excellent detailed investigation of the role of Anglo American companies in the corporate life of South Africa up to the 1980s; much still holds true)
 
Shula Marks & Anthony Atmore (eds, 1980) Economy and Society in Pre-Industrial South Africa London: Longman. (some important chapters in this)
 
Shula Marks & Richard Rathbone (eds, 1982) Industrialisation and Social Change in South Africa London: Longman. (some important chapters in this)
 
T. Dunbar Moodie (1994) Going For Gold: Men, Mines and Migration Berkeley: University of California Press. (as the title indicates)
 
*Brian Roberts (1976) Kimberley, Turbulent City Cape Town: David Philip. (a very good read)
 
*Charles Van Onselen (1982) New Babylon, New Nineveh: Everyday Life on the Witwatersrand 1886-1914 Cape Town: David Philip. (outstanding, and a very good read)
 
Robert V. Turrell (1987) Capital and Labour on the Kimberley Diamond Fields 1871-1890 Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (as it says)
 
Geoffrey Wheatcroft (1985) The Randlords: The Men Who Made South Africa London: Weidenfeld & Nicholson. (focuses on people and their actions, a good read)
 
William Worger (1987) South Africa’s City of Diamonds Yale University Press. (Kimberley, with the focus on the details of labour organisation)
 
David Yudelman (1984) The Emergence of Modern South Africa Johannesburg: Jonathan Ball. (overview of economy and state over long period; Marxist, a good read, largely convincing)
   
Some useful journals
 
J African Studies
J Commonwealth & Imperial History
J Southern African Studies
South African Historical Journal
 

Prof Liz Stanley
Sociology, University of Edinburgh, George Square, Edinburgh EH8 9LD
http://www.sociology.ed.ac.uk/staff_profiles/stanley_liz

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12/06/12post – Lives & Letters Mailing: June 2012

Welcome to another Lives & Letters Mailing – two new features of the Olive Schreiner Letters Online are announced.

1. More Schreiner letters are now available! The Ronald Levine Collection

A new collection of 24 letters written by Schreiner to Havelock Ellis, Margaret Moscheles and Annie Botha, among others, have kindly been made available to us by Ronald Levine from Johannesburg. These fascinating letters have been transcribed by the Schreiner letters project team, and they are all now available on Olive Schreiner Letters Online via the following link: (http://www.oliveschreiner.org/vre?view=collections&archiveid=39&arrangeby=colorder)

2. Graph of Schreiner Letters by Year

Do you want a quick way to get a sense of the shape of the Olive Schreiner letters as a whole? The link below provides a graph showing the number of extant letters per year she wrote. Access Schreiner's Letters by Year.

The clearly visible peaks and troughs on the graph show that Schreiner’s letter-writing fluctuated over her lifetime. These fluctuations cannot be explained by reference, for example, to military censorship, such as during the South African War (1899-1902) or the Great War, nor by her mass burning of letters when she left South Africa for Europe in late 1913. However, the content of Schreiner’s letters provides some clues about these downturns and upturns, around the interesting relationship between the number of letters Schreiner wrote and her view of and desire for social relationships and involvements at particular times in her life. This is implied in particular by the fall in the number of letters written when Schreiner returned to South Africa in 1889, for at this time she turned to focus on impersonal concerns and fought for solitude in which to write.

More news about the Schreiner Letters Online will follow in a few weeks …

Liz Stanley & the OSLP team

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About the Lives & Letters mailing list:

Would you like to hear more about 'lives & events' from across the globe? You can subscribe to the Lives & Letters mailing list by emailing: NABS@ed.ac.uk or oliveschreiner@yahoo.co.uk. Alternatively, you can self-subscribe by sending a blank email to sympa@mlist.is.ed.ac.uk with the following in the subject: sub lives-and-letters

To unsubscribe from the list at any time, please contact us or send a blank email to sympa@mlist.is.ed.ac.uk with 'unsubscribe lives-and-letters' in the subject.

The Centre for Narrative and Auto/Biographical Studies (NABS) mailing list was migrated to the new Lives & Letters list in December 2011. Mailings dating back to early 2007 are archived on the Centre for NABS website: http://www.sps.ed.ac.uk/NABS/; previous Lives & Letters mailings are also available on the Olive Schreiner Letters Project’s Edinburgh-based website: http://www.oliveschreinerletters.ed.ac.uk/index.htm

Olive Schreiner Letters Online, a major new, free research resource for researchers and students across the social sciences, humanities and arts, is a website through which digitised transcriptions of Schreiner's letters can be accessed. It enables world-wide access to transcriptions of Schreiner's letters free of charge to students & researchers. And it provides many tools to aid reading and analysis, including sophisticated search and find tools, lists of letters by analytical themes and a detailed bibliography of Schreiner's shorter & longer publications. See: http://www.oliveschreiner.org


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26/03/12post – Lives & Letters Mailing: March 2012

Welcome to another Lives & Letters Mailing!

This mailing contains information about:


1. Letters and words changing lives in Ecuador
2. Memory Box - an installation by Niroshini Thambar, Edinburgh
3. W.T. Stead - A Centenary Conference for a Newspaper Revolutionary, British Library, 16-17 April 2012
4. Writing Lives: an interdisciplinary symposium on the uses of biography, University of Warwick, 25 May 2012
5. Women's History Scotland: 2012 Annual Conference: 'Women and Wellbeing' Historical Perspectives,
University of Edinburgh, 13 October 2012
6. Letters between Mothers and Daughters, c1200 to the present, Monash Centre, Prato, mid April 2013
7. The Expatriate Archive Centre, The Hague, the Netherlands
8. Life Writing Matters in Europe, eds. Marijke Huisman, Anneke Ribberink, Monica Soeting & Alfred Hornung.
Heidelberg: Winter Verlag
9. Announcing Words & Silences, the official journal of the International Oral History Association
http :/ / wordsandsilences . org /
10. Journal Special Issues:
a/b: Auto/Biography Studies 25.2 - The Work of Life Writing!
Biography 34.1 (2011) - Life Writing as Intimate Publics

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1. Letters and words changing lives in Ecuador

On November 25, 2011, the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, the municipality of Quito in partnership with the German Development Cooperation (GIZ) and with support from UN Women, issued a call to solicit testimonies of women’s lives through letters, asking also for letters on what would make a better world without violence or discrimination against women.

The result of this innovative participatory campaign was overwhelming -in three months 10,000 letters were received. See the link below for more information about this fascinating project:

http://www.unwomen.org/2012/03/letters-and-words-changing-lives-in-ecuador/

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2. Memory Box - an installation by Niroshini Thambar, Edinburgh

Memory Box - an installation by Niroshini Thambar

An installation of audio memoir, music and visual/audio ephemera that engages with identity, migration and memory from a Sri Lankan Diaspora perspective.

This is the culmination of an artist residency with the Edinburgh Mela which has given me the space to develop my artistic practice through engaging with ideas around identity and diaspora from my own personal/cultural perspective -  that of a British-born second generation Sri Lankan Tamil.

Having looked at the area of work that you are engaged in, I hope that this may be of some interest to you

The preview is from 6-9.30pm on Friday 23 March 2012 at Art's Complex, St Margaret's House, 151 London Road, Edinburgh EH7 6AE.

The exhibition runs from 24 March until the 8th of April.

I hope to see you there, and also would be very grateful if you were able to circulate this information to any students/other contacts that you think may also be interested.

With kind regards

Niroshini Thambar
Artist-in-Residence, Edinburgh Mela
07963 596 889
www.niroshinithambar.com


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3. W.T. Stead - A Centenary Conference for a Newspaper Revolutionary, British Library, 16-17 April 2012

“When William Stead died on the maiden voyage of the Titanic in April 1912, he was the most famous Englishman on board. He was one of the inventors of the modern tabloid. His advocacy of ‘government by journalism’ helped launch military campaigns. His exposé of child prostitution raised the age of consent to sixteen, yet his investigative journalism got him thrown in jail. A mass of contradictions and a crucial figure in the history of the British press, Stead was a towering presence in the cultural life of late Victorian and Edwardian society. This conference marks the centenary of his death. We aim to recover Stead’s extraordinary influence on modern English culture and to mark a major moment in the history of journalism.  In Stead’s spirit we will also investigate our own revolution in newspapers and print journalism in the age of digital news. With Stead as a focal point, we will use aspects of his career to develop multiple avenues into the history of his time and ours. This is not a narrowly focused specialist conference, but one that aims to adopt wide cultural perspectives”

The conference is organised by Laurel Brake, Professor Emerita
of Literature and Print Culture, Birkbeck, Professor Jim Mussell,
Professor Roger Luckhurst and Ed King, Head of Newspaper collections at the
British Library.  Keynote speakers include Laurel Brake, John
Durham Peters, Tristram Hunt MP and Geoffrey Robertson QC.

Across the two days, amongst many others, papers will be presented by:
Professor Alexis Easley, University of St Thomas: 'W.T. Stead, Women and the Review of Reviews'
Drs Maria Di Cenzo and Lucy Delap: 'Chivalry and Pragmatism: W.T. Stead and the Women's Movement' ;Christine Pullen- “Featherbrained” or a Force to be reckoned with: W.T. Stead, the New Journalism and the New Woman
Tom Hughes: Revolting Accusations - Mr Stead and the Pall Mall Gazette v 'the Honourable and Gallant Col FC Hughes Hallet MP - The Great Parliamentary Scandal of 1887 Deborah Mutch - Stead, Hardie and the Boer War
Clare Gill: ”I'm really going to kill him this time” Olive Schreiner, W.T. Stead and the Politics of Publicity.
Mike Barrett: W.T. Stead and Cecil Rhodes

A programme for the conference can be found on the conference website -https://sites.google.com/site/stead2012/. 

If you are your colleagues are interested Tickets can be booked by phoning the British Library Box Office +44 (0)1937 546546 or on-site in the ticket office at St
Pancras.  Further details of prices can be found at http://www.bl.uk/whatson/events/event124192.html

With best wishes,
Robert                          

Robert Davies                                                   
Engagement Support Officer, Social
Sciences
The British Library
96 Euston Road
London NW1
2DB             
 
+44 (0)207 412 7318   twitter:
@BLRobertDavies
 
http://www.bl.uk/socialsciences


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4. Writing Lives: an interdisciplinary symposium on the uses of biography, University of Warwick, 25 May 2012

Call for Contributions

Jointly hosted by the Department of Film and Television Studies and the
Institute of Advanced Study, University of Warwick
DEADLINE:  Monday 23 April 2012

This symposium will explore the methodological, ethical and intellectual
implications of using biographical material in scholarly practice.
'Biographical material' is defined broadly, including, for example,
historical narratives of real people, biography as fiction and non-fiction,
film/television/digital adaptations of real lives, or research which
incorporates aspects of the life stories of subjects, such as narrative
inquiry, or oral history.

It will offer a space to reflect on the practical challenges and rewards
presented by using data about the lives of real people.  It will also offer
room for discussion and debate on the boundaries offered by biography:
boundaries of history and narrative, boundaries of truth and fiction,
boundaries of form and meaning.

Contributions can take the form of EITHER a 20 minute paper, outlining
research ideas which relate to the themes of the symposium OR a 10 minute
presentation, which discusses the ethical, methodological or scholarly
implications of using biographical data in your own research.
Contributions are particularly welcome in the following areas:

•         biographical fiction/non-fiction

•         the 'biopic' in film or television

•         biography in/and digital culture

•         auto-biography

•         biography as history/narrative

•         Research methodologies related to biography

Please send an abstract (max 200 words), and a brief biographical (!) note to
hannah.andrews@warwick.ac.uk <mailto:hannah.andrews@warwick.ac.uk> by MONDAY 23 APRIL 2012.  Be sure to specify the type of contribution you wish to make.

Applicants will be informed by Friday 27 April.

Dr Hannah Andrews
University of Warwick

e-Portfolio
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/study/csde/gsp/eportfolio/directory/pg/fsread/
Producer, Third Row Centre www.thirdrowcentre.com


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5. Women's History Scotland: 2012 Annual Conference: 'Women and Wellbeing' Historical Perspectives, University of Edinburgh, 13 October 2012

Call for Papers

This year's annual conference will explore the historical connections between women and 'wellbeing'. We welcome proposals relating to all historical periods (eg. classical, medieval, modern, contemporary) and all geographical places including Scotland.

We understand 'wellbeing' to refer to sets of ideas and practices that encompass (but are not restricted to) the following areas:

-       healing, health and medicine
-       social work, philanthropy, the welfare state and social policy
-       spiritual roles, religious interventions and missionary activity
-       'emotional labour' within family, household, workplace or other institutions
-       'commonweal' and community
-       humanitarianism and international concerns

The conference will explore women's roles as carers and practitioners but also as patients or subjects of intervention. Has women's historical association with caring and nurturing roles served to restrict or empower them? To what extent has women's 'hidden' labour advanced the 'wellbeing' of past societies? In what ways have the gendered dynamics of health and wellbeing shifted across time? How might we analyse the relationship between carers/practitioners and their patients/clients? The conference will also examine the contributions that women's and gender history can make to current debates concerning social policy, health and welfare; we particularly welcome papers in this area.

We welcome proposals for a) papers of approximately 20 minutes in length or b) poster presentations, from scholars at all stages of their careers and from independent researchers. The conference organisers are Louise Jackson, Lesley Orr and Emily Stammitti (School of History, Classics and Archaeology, University of Edinburgh).

Proposals of around 300 words, together with a brief biography (maximum of 100 words), should be submitted to Emily Stammitti (E.J.Stammitti@sms.ed.ac.uk), copied to Lesley Orr (lesley.orr@ed.ac.uk) by 1 May 2012.

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6. Letters between Mothers and Daughters, c1200 to the present, Monash Centre, Prato, mid April 2013

We are organizing a small symposium in mid April, 2013 at the Monash Centre in Prato to explore continuities and changes in the correspondence between mothers and daughters over this extended period. We wish to investigate the ways in which mother-daughter relationships were mediated through correspondence in different periods. We are interested primarily in the changing possibilities opened up in, and through, letters between mothers and daughters over time. In addition to the letters produced in actual familial relationships, we also welcome papers discussing the letters between religious and spiritual mothers and daughters.

Please send abstracts of about 500 words by 30 June to:
Barbara Caine
School of Philosophical and Historical Inquiry
University of Sydney
NSW 2006
Australia
 
barbara.caine@sydney.edu.au


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7. The Expatriate Archive Centre, The Hague, the Netherlands

Life writing is a key theme in the lives of expatriates. Living abroad
for a longer period of time, expatriates often use letters, diaries and
other forms of writing to maintain relations with their former social
network and to deal with their situation as foreigners in between cultures.

We would like to draw your attention to the *Expatriate Archive Centre*,
which aims to promote the social history of expatriate life. Founded in
2008, the EAC now holds about 55 archives in which you can find letters,
blogs, diaries and memoirs, photographs, drawings and films from families
living or having lived an expatriate life somewhere in the world since the
early twentieth century.

The sources gathered by the EAC, either written or translated into
English, are made available as electronic documents and offer unique
possibilities to study expatriate’s experiences from a wide range of
perspectives and disciplines into themes such as expatriate’s observations
and representations of other cultures; practices of communication;
constructions of ‘home’; expatriate’s dealings with feelings like
loneliness; women’s roles in making a family life abroad etc.

Scholars interested in expatriate’s life writings are invited to contact
the Expatriate Archive Centre in The Hague, the Netherlands.

Website: xpatarchive.com

E-mail: welcome@xpatarchive.com

Twitter: twitter.com/xpatarchive

Facebook: facebook.com/xpatarchive


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8. Life Writing Matters in Europe, eds. Marijke Huisman, Anneke Ribberink, Monica Soeting & Alfred Hornung. Heidelberg: Winter Verlag

(www.winter-verlag-hd.de)

ISBN: 978-3-8253-5963-8. Price: 42 Euro

Both the practice and study of life writing flourish worldwide, especially
since the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989. This major watershed in the
history of Europe has generated intensive memory work through life writing,
in the former satellite states of the Soviet Union and far beyond.
Highlighting auto/biographical practices in western and eastern, old and
new or future parts of Europe, the essays in this volume discuss the
construction of individual, cultural and political identities within a
changing landscape from the late eighteenth century until the present.
 *Life Writing Matters in Europe* contains a selection of reworked papers
presented at the international conference ‘Life Writing in Europe’ (2009)
that was the starting point for the network IABA Europe
(http://www.iaba-europe.eu)

Table of Contents

Marijke Huisman - Introduction: Life Writing Matters in Europe;
Catherine Viollet - European French-Language Life Writing in the Late
Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth Centuries;
Elena Gretchanaia - Cultural Models: Russian Eighteenth- and Early
Nineteenth-Century Francophone Life Writing;
Marijke Huisman - Translation Politics: Foreign Autobiographies on the
Nineteenth Century Dutch Book Market;
Pawe Rodak - Past, Present, and Future of Autobiography Competitions and
Archives in Poland;
Christian Moser - Museums of the Self: Autobiographic Memory and the
Cultural Practice of Collecting;
Sabine Kim - Voices and Inscriptions: Making Sense(s) in Autobiography;
Nataliya Rodigina & Tatiana Saburova - Changing Identity Formations in
Nineteenth-Century Russian Intellectuals’ Autobiographies;
Gunnthorunn Gudmundsdottir - A Writer’s Life: The Modernist Group and
Questions of Identity in Autobiographical Writing;
Esra Almas - Self and The City. Locus of Identity in Orhan Pamuk’s *Istanbul:
Memories and the City*;
Anna Izabela Cicho -Construction of Identity and the Role of Autobiography
in V.S. Naipaul’s Work;
Barbara Henkes - Letter-Writing and the Construction of a Transnational
Family: A Private Correspondence between the Netherlands and Germany,
1920–1949;
Eva Rovers - A Dutch Collector with a German Heart: The Regional Aspect of
Life Writing in the Case of Helene Kröller-Müller (1869-1939);
Lisbeth Larsson - Uses of Biography: The Swedish Version;
Mineke Bosch - Well-Behaved Women Seldom Make History, But If They Do...
Reflections on Gender and Biography;
Anneke Ribberink - Margaret Thatcher and Gro Harlem Brundtland: Two Women
Prime Ministers from the Spectre of a Comparative Biography;
Martins Kaprans - Constructing Generational Identity in Post-Communist
Autobiographies: the Case of Latvia;
Leena Kurvet-Käosaar - An Anthology of Lives: Jaan Kross’s *Kallid
Kaasteelised* and Estonian Memorial Culture;
Ioana Luca - Post-Communist Life Writing and Memory Maps


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9. Announcing Words & Silences, the official journal of the International Oral History Association
http :/ / wordsandsilences . org /

Acceptance of Articles for the next issue starts on 1 April 2012; submissions close 30 May 2012

Words & Silences invites oral historians from a diverse range of disciplines to submit academic and professional work representing salient research and or practice from their respective regions of the world. This latest issue builds on the success of our inaugural 2011 launch of Words & Silences online, aiming to broaden our audience and continue to highlight quality academic and professional oral history work from all corners of the world.

Words & Silences is an electronic bilingual publication in English and Spanish and includes the
following subsections:
€ Double blind peer reviewed academic articles (up to 5,000 words)
€ Community/professional field based project reports (up to 3,000 words)
€ Book/exhibition/online reviews (up to1,000 words)
Accompanying images, film excerpts, audio recordings and URL links are welcome.

The main theme for this issue is “Collaboration.”

Organisation and Submission Details
For preparation of manuscripts and materials, please visit our section For Authors in the journal website: http :// www . iohanet . org / journal / guidelines . html
Deadline for completed manuscripts: 30 May 2012.
Papers should follow the Author Guidelines, as specified and be submitted online to
http :// wordsandsilences . org / index . php / ws / information / authors
Acceptance notifications are sent to authors by 15 July 2012.
Final revised papers are due by 1 August 2012.

Submission inquiries should be directed to the co-editors.
Juan José Gutiérrez (Spanish) - juan_gutierrez@iohanet.org
Helen Klaebe (English) - h.klaebe@iohanet.org


----------------------------------------------------------
10. Journal Special Issues:

a/b: Auto/Biography Studies 25.2 - The Work of Life Writing!

Biography 34.1 (2011) - Life Writing as Intimate Publics

a/b: Auto/Biography Studies 25.2 - The Work of Life Writing! is available in print or online through Project MUSE. Inside you will find:
 
“Introduction: The Work of Life Writing” by Clare Brant and Alison Wood
“Genetic Studies of Life Writing” by Philippe Lejeune
“Life Writing in the Family” by Jeremy D. Popkin
“‘Unlike actors, politicians or eminent military men’: The Meaning of Hard Work in Working Class Autobiography” by Claire Lynch
“Ecobiographical Negotiations in Richard K. Nelson’s The Island Within” by Micha Edlich
“The Ethnographic Work of Cross-Cultural Memoir” by Mary Besemeres
“Heroes and Hostages” by Olivia Sagan
“Then and Now: Comparing the Soviet and Post-Soviet Experience in Latvian Autobiographies” by Mārtiņš Kaprāns
“The Making of Mr. Gray’s Anatomy: Biography of a Medical Textbook” by Ruth Richardson
“Lives in Institutions” by Kathryn Hughes
Conference Report by Clare Brant and Max Saunders
 
Reviews
Uncommon Women: Gender and Representation in Nineteenth-Century U.S. Women’s Writing. By Laura Laffrado (Columbus: Ohio State UP, 2009). Reviewed by Rebecca Harrison
Representation and Resistance: South Asian and African Women’s Texts at Home and in the Diaspora. By Jaspal Kaur Singh (Calgary: U of Calgary P, 2008). Reviewed by Anastasia Christou
 
It's not too late to subscribe! If you send in your payment today, we'll rush you a copies of Volume 25, Issues 1 & 2. Individual subscriptions are only $25 per year ($35 non-US).
 
a/b: Auto/Biography Studies is a forum for interdisciplinary scholarship and criticism along the broadest spectrum of life writing, and we emphasize work that deals with diverse ethnic and national topics. Please visit us at http://abstudies.web.unc.edu/ for additional information.
 
Sincerely,
Jenn Williamson, Managing Editor
a/b: Auto/Biography Studies
Department of English & Comparative Literature
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
http://abstudies.web.unc.edu/


Biography 34.1 (2011) Special Issue: Life Writing as Intimate Publics

Editor's Introduction
Introduction: Life Writing as Intimate Publics
pp. v-xi Margaretta Jolly

Articles
The Present of Intimacy: My Very Public Private Life
pp. 1-10
Vesna Goldsworthy

The Public, the Private, and the Intimate: Richard Sennett’s and Lauren Berlant’s Cultural Criticism in Dialogue
pp. 11-24
Gabriele Linke

Intimate Economies: PostSecret and the Affect of Confession
pp. 25-36
Anna Poletti
“Suffused by Feeling and Affect”: The Intimate Public of Personal Mommy Blogging
pp. 37-55
Aimée Morrison

Diasporic Disclosures: Social Networking, Neda, and the 2009 Iranian Presidential Elections
pp. 56-69
Nima Naghibi

Communism: Intimate Publics
pp. 70-82
Ioana Luca

Taking Intimate Publics to China: Yang Jiang and the Unfinished Business of Sentiment
pp. 83-95
Jesse Field

“I’d Like My Life Back”: Corporate Personhood and the BP Oil Disaster
pp. 96-107
Laura E. Lyons

Who Do You Think You Are?: Intimate Pasts Made Public
pp. 108-118
Claire Lynch

Writing Biodigital Life: Personal Genomes and Digital Media
pp. 119-131
Kate O’Riordan

Tell-Tale Heart: Organ Donation and Transplanted Subjectivities
pp. 132-140
Susan M. Stabile

Recent Trends in Using Life Stories for Social and Political Activism
pp. 141-179
Helga Lénárt-Cheng, Darija Walker

Life Writing and Intimate Publics: A Conversation with Lauren Berlant
pp. 180-187
Lauren Berlant, Jay Prosser

Reviewed Elsewhere
pp. 188-248

Contributors
pp. 249-251


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About the Lives & Letters mailing list:

Would you like to hear more about ‘lives & events’ from across the globe? You can subscribe to the Lives & Letters mailing list by emailing: oliveschreiner@yahoo.co.uk. Alternatively, you can self-subscribe to the mailing list by sending a blank email to sympa@mlist.is.ed.ac.uk with the following in the subject: sub lives-and-letters

To unsubscribe from the list at any time, please contact us or send a blank email to sympa@mlist.is.ed.ac.uk with ‘unsubscribe lives-and-letters’ in the subject.

Olive Schreiner Letters Online, a major new, free research resource for researchers and students across the social sciences, humanities and arts, is a website through which digitised transcriptions of Schreiner’s letters can be accessed. It enables world-wide access to transcriptions of Schreiner’s letters free of charge to students & researchers. And it provides many tools to aid reading and analysis, including sophisticated search and find tools, lists of letters by analytical themes and a detailed bibliography of Schreiner’s shorter & longer publications. See: 
www.oliveschreiner.org

To find out more about the Olive Schreiner Letters Project, please see: http://www.oliveschreinerletters.ed.ac.uk/index.html. Previous Lives & Letters mailings are archived on the Project website.


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21/01/12post – Olive Schreiner Letters Online - website launched!

Dear Colleagues

We are delighted to announce that the
Olive Schreiner Letters Online is now live!

Fully searchable transcriptions of Schreiner's c4800 extant letters plus an editorial apparatus around these are accessible via www.oliveschreiner.org


We hope you enjoy exploring the site! 

Best wishes
Liz Stanley & the Olive Schreiner Letters Project Team

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20/12/11post Lives & Letters Mailing 1: December 2011

Welcome to the first ‘Lives & Letters’ mailing!

The Centre for NABS list has now been migrated to the new ‘Lives & Letters’ list, through which you are receiving this mailing. The updated mailing list is attached to the soon to be launched ‘Olive Schreiner Letters Online’ website, which is publishing transcriptions of all of Schreiner’s c4800 extant letters in January 2012 and will shortly be available at www.oliveschreiner.org. More news to follow!

Through the updated mailing list you will continue to receive information about narrative events as well as information about - as the title says - lives and letters and related research. You will have hopefully received a ‘Welcome to the ‘Lives & Letters’ mailing list’ message in the form of an automated email a few days ago. If you would like to access the list homepage (which one of the automated links on the ‘Welcome’ email takes you to, but is not very clear about), you will need to sign up as an ‘EASE friend’. The University of Edinburgh uses an authentication system to access electronic resources called EASE and by signing up as a ‘friend’ you can access some of its features. The link to this is: https://www.ease.ed.ac.uk/userdocs/friend.html. However, you do not need to take any action whatsoever or become an ‘EASE friend’ to continue to receive mailings! We can do this for you – and of course, as before, do contact us if you would like to be removed from the list at any time. Many thanks.

We would also be extremely grateful if you could publicise the new list as widely as possible among your colleagues and contacts. Many thanks!

We will be in touch early in the New Year with information about Olive Schreiner Letters Online!

Best wishes
Liz Stanley and Andrea Salter (of the Schreiner Letters Project Team)

---------------------------------

This mailing contains information about:

1.  Olive Schreiner Letters Project – News from the 1870s uploaded!
2.  Information about the Scottish Oral History Centre (SOHC)
3. ‘Family Ties: Recollection and Representation’ conference at University of London, March 2012
4. ‘Constructing narratives of continuity and change’, an interdisciplinary conference at Canterbury Christ Church University, May 2012

----------------------------------------------------------

1. Olive Schreiner Letters Project – News from the 1870s uploaded!

The Olive Schreiner Letters Project Team has recently uploaded another news item to the Project homepage <http://www.oliveschreinerletters.ed.ac.uk/> which consists of two letters from Schreiner in the 1870s about her work as a governess on Boer farms. This is the final ‘taster’ before the more than 4800 transcriptions of Schreiner letters go live in January 2012. We will be sending out further information regarding this as soon as possible.

----------------------------------------------------------

2.  Information about the Scottish Oral History Centre (SOHC)

The next Introduction to Oral History seminar run by the Scottish Oral History Centre (SOHC) will take place on Friday 20th January 2012.
 
These ‘day schools’ seek to introduce oral history theory, methodology, technology and ethics/legal considerations to anyone looking to utilise oral history interviewing and/or analysis. We at the SOHC (based at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow) strive to promote ‘best practice’ in the use and conduct of oral histories and to teach and advise on the practicalities of conducting oral histories. These training seminars are suitable for anyone thinking about using oral history interviewing in their current or future research and projects (for example, dissertations and theses, community and local history projects, and museums and archives) although they will appeal to anyone interested in the use and presentation of oral history in general. We have extensive experience in providing training to HE audiences (staff and students), those from museums, libraries and archives, local authority, community and heritage organizations (including HLF projects).
 
You can find more information on the Scottish Oral History Centre, including a provisional programme for the training seminar, on our website:
http://www.strath.ac.uk/humanities/research/history/sohc/
 
Please note that places are limited and available on a first come first served basis. If you would like to attend, please complete a registration form and return by Thursday 12th January 2012 to:
 
Claire McConnell, Research and Knowledge Exchange Team, Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences, University of Strathclyde, Livingstone Tower, 26 Richmond Street, Glasgow, G1 1XH.
 
You can also email your completed form to 
claire.mcconnell@strath.ac.uk
 
Warm wishes
Angela
 
Dr Angela Bartie
Lecturer in History
Acting Director, Scottish Oral History Centre Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences McCance, Richmond St Glasgow G1 1XQ
Tel: 0141 548 2225
 
Claire McConnell
Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences
Research & Knowledge Exchange Team (RaKET)
Livingstone Tower Room 417
26 Richmond Street
Glasgow G1 1XH
 
Tel:      0141 548 3511
Fax:     0141 548 4757
Email:  claire.mcconnell@strath.ac.uk

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3. ‘Family Ties: Recollection and Representation’ conference at University of London, March 2012

Dear Colleagues

Please see the attached draft programme and abstracts for the forthcoming ‘Family Ties: Recollection and Representation’ conference at University of London, 9 March 2012.

Registration will open in the new year and will be advertised on the IGRS website.  I will be sending out a mass email to my mailing list in January, so please contact me if interested. The conference fee will be £35.00 (£20.00 for students).

http://igrs.sas.ac.uk/events/conferences-workshops/family-ties.html
http://www.senatehouseevents.co.uk/enquiries/map-and-directions

I very much hope that you will be able to attend.

Kind regards
Sally

Dr. Sally Waterman
07815 777 012
www.sallywaterman.com
www.axisweb.org/artist/sallywaterman

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4. Constructing narratives of continuity and change, An interdisciplinary conference at Canterbury Christ Church University

Saturday 12 May 2012 | 10am - 5pm | £25 per delegate
The Old Sessions House, Canterbury Campus, Faculty of Education
www.canterbury.ac.uk/education/conferences

Keynote speakers
Molly Andrews is Professor of Sociology, and Co-director of the Centre for
Narrative Research
 at the University of East London, England. Her research
interests include the psychological basis of political commitment,
psychological challenges posed by societies in transition to democracy,
patriotism, conversations between generations, gender and aging, and
counter-narratives.

Laura Formenti, PhD in Education, psychologist and psychotherapist, is
Associate Professor at the Department of Human Sciences for Education,
Università degli Studi di Milano Bicocca (Italy), where she teaches General
Pedagogy and Family Counselling.

Professor Linden West is a Director of Research Development, Canterbury
Christ Church University, Visiting Professor, Paris Nanterre and
co-coordinator of a European Biographical Research Network. His books include
Using Biographical Methods in Social Research (Sage), Beyond Fragments,
adults, motivation and higher education (Taylor and Francis). He is presently
co-editing a collection for Karnac on psychoanalysis and education.

A one day conference to be held in Canterbury which will explore narratives
of continuity and change in the context of a difficult and unpredictable
world. Aimed at post-graduate students, tutors and researchers, it will
include presentations and workshops that embrace auto/biography and narrative
research within education, and across a range of disciplines and professional
sectors.

Auto/biography and Narrative Research Theme Group
Canterbury Christ Church University is home to an extensive body of research
in the broad field of auto/biographical narrative studies and life history.
There is a thematic group that brings together academics from different
disciplines, with particular strengths in education, health and social care
studies. The thematic group has provided a base for major funded research,
which includes a recent EU Lifelong Learning financed study of
non-traditional learners in universities, in 8 countries (RANLHE). There is
also extensive work on narrative and careers counselling, as well as on life
writing, life stories and community development. The group contains a
substantial cluster of doctoral students, who are using these methods to
chronicle and theorise change processes in diverse contexts.

Conference
Proposals for papers and workshops on the following themes are welcome:
* Narrative and auto/biography: self/other, immediacy/memory
* Whose story? What the researcher brings to the story told
* Reflexivity and its parameters: power and unconscious processes
* Narratives of adult learners in turbulent times
* Creating spaces for learning and knowing
* The role of narrative in managing change
* Connecting the big and the intimate pictures in a 'runaway world'
* Interdisciplinary and auto/biographical narrative research
* Beyond words: other ways of representing lives
* Stories of resistance and resilience.

Proposals should be sent to the conference administrator
barry.maughan@canterbury.ac.uk as an attached file of no more than 500 words,
single spaced, to include a title, indicating research paper or workshop, and
relationship to the conference theme(s). The conference language is English.
Please submit in Times New Roman 12pt. A separate attachment should detail
the author(s) name(s), affiliation and contact details.

Research paper presentations will be coordinated into groups and be of 30
minutes (20 minutes for presentation and 10 minutes discussion). Workshops
will be 45 minutes. All proposals for the conference will be 'blind reviewed'
by the conference committee.

* Abstract/proposal by Monday 16 January 2012
* Response to proposal by Tuesday 31 January 2012
* Full paper by Monday 23 April 2012, to be placed on webpage before the
conference.

We are intending to publish a book following the conference. Authors of
appropriate papers will be invited to submit their work for potential
inclusion in the publication. Details about the subsequent publication will
be available after the conference. A draft conference programme will be
available in March 2012.

You can book your place now online at:
www.canterbury.ac.uk/education/conferences
For more information, please phone 01892 507500 or email
barry.maughan@canterbury.ac.uk
Dr Hazel Reid, Auto/biography and narrative research theme coordinator:
hazel.reid@canterbury.ac.uk

Professor Linden West PhD, FRSA.
Director of Research Development
Faculty of Education
Canterbury Christ Church University
Canterbury, CT1 1QU, UK.
Phone (0044) (0) 1227 782732
Email linden.west@canterbury.ac.uk


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05/12/11post
NABS Mailing: early December 2011

Welcome to another mailing from NABS...


This NABS mailing contains collated information about:

1.    News from Olive Schreiner’s letters in November 1880!
2.    Oxford Centre for Life-Writing (OCLW): future events
3.    CNR/RAW Symposium British Library London 2 March 2012

--------------------------------
News from Olive Schreiner’s letters in November 1880!

The Olive Schreiner Letters Project Team has recently uploaded another news item to the Project website <http://www.oliveschreinerletters.ed.ac.uk/> – this is a letter Schreiner wrote in November 1880 and concerns an epiphanous moment for her, with England on the horizon, and the death (a ritual murder) of Hamilton Hope, married to one of her cousins, having just happened:

This letter is to Schreiner’s eldest sister Katie, and it opens with Schreiner invoking turn-taking in letter-writing as the expected norm – but that, because there was “a good opportunity of posting,” she would nonetheless make use of. This was most likely a passing traveller or a workman on the tramp, who would be entrusted to take letters to a town for posting. It invokes in a very immediate way the moment of its writing – “it is a bitterly cold evening” – and then in a seemingly low-key way comments “I must not forget to tell you” what Schreiner must have been simply bursting to tell her family and friends. This concerns her life-changing plan to train as a nurse in “England” (although it was actually Edinburgh, in Scotland, that her friends the Browns arranged for her to apply to). The final paragraph in the letter is concerned with the Basuto War and one of its tragedies for the wider Schreiner family. A magistrate within the Colonial authority, Hamilton Hope was misled into attending a traditional ceremony thinking this was being held to defuse tensions, but he was murdered in a killing with some ritualistic aspects. Hope was married to Olive Schreiner’s cousin Emma, and she had stayed with the Hopes some two years or so before and was very fond of them.

Soon there will be news from Schreiner in the 1870s too! Please see the OSLP Website for more information.

--------------------------------
Oxford Centre for Life-Writing (OCLW)
www.wolfson.ox.ac.uk/clusters/life-writing
 
The Oxford Centre for Life-Writing exists to encourage those who write biography and memoir, and those who undertake research on life-narratives. It is directed by renowned biographer Professor Hermione Lee and co-directed by postcolonial scholar Professor Elleke Boehmer, and is based at Wolfson College, Oxford. Through events and a dynamic virtual presence, we aim to bring together scholars, students and practitioners, nationally and internationally, within and outside academia, who share an interest in life-writing.
 
Forthcoming Events:
 
Next term, OCLW will host the Weinrebe Lectures in Life-Writing. On Tuesdays across January and February, four distinguished speakers – Michèle Roberts, Alan Hollinghurst, Candia McWilliam and Hisham Matar – will talk at Wolfson on the theme of ‘Fiction and Auto/Biography’. Please see our webpages for more information.
 
Towards the end of next term, on Tuesday 28 February, OCLW will hold a seminar: ‘Solitary or Socialite? The Challenges of Romantic Group Biography’. Dr Daisy Hay (author of Young Romantics and visiting scholar at Wolfson, Oxford) and Dr Pete Newbon (author of The Children of the Romantics (work in progress)) will discuss the challenges of writing group biographies of Romantic literary figures.
 
The term will end with Dr Olivia Smith (St John’s, Oxford) presenting the Life-Writing Lunch, on Tuesday 6 March, on her research on John Locke.
 
We hope to see you at an OCLW event in the near future!
 
With best wishes,
 
Rachel Hewitt (on behalf of Hermione Lee, Elleke Boehmer and myself)
 
Dr. Rachel Hewitt,
Weinrebe Fellow in Life-Writing and Leverhulme Early Career Research Fellow,
Wolfson College,
University of Oxford. OX2 6UD
rachel.hewitt@wolfson.ox.ac.uk


--------------------------------
CNR/RAW Symposium British Library London 2 March 2012

Dear Members,

I am delighted to send out this program for a forthcoming symposium Writing Narratives: Reflections and Diffractions March 2, 2012, at the British Library, London.

The symposium is arranged in cooperation between the Centre for Narrative Research (CNR), University of East London and The Network for Reflexive Academic Writing Methodologies (RAW), Mid Sweden University.

Welcome to listen to the wonderful speakers Carolyn Steedman, Olivia Guaraldo, Denise Riley, Annelie Bränström Öhman, and also Liz Stanley in the RAW Dialogue Chair. The day ends with a book launch for the volume Emergent Writing Methodologies in Feminist Studies (Routledge Livholts Ed.), written by a group of RAW members.

Please spread the information to people you think may be interested. Note that there is a limited number of places and that early booking are essential. Thank you.

Best wishes,

Mona Livholts
Coordinator RAW
Livholts Mona Mona.Livholts@miun.se

Further information, including a booking form and details about the Programme, can be accessed here!

--------------------------------
A reminder please about the planned migration of the NABS mailing list:

The old Centre for Narrative & Auto/Biographical Studies (NABS) Mailing List (through which this mailing was sent) will be superseded by an **updated mailing list** with a somewhat wider remit on ‘Lives & Letters’. This will be attached to the brand new ‘Olive Schreiner Letters Online’ website, which is publishing all of Schreiner’s c4800 extant letters. It will be officially launched in January 2012 and available at www.oliveschreiner.org; and the NABS mailing list will be migrated in the next week or so to ‘Lives & Letters’. Through the updated mailing list, you will continue to receive information about narrative events as well as information about – as the title says – lives and letters and related research. This update will happen automatically, although of course, just as now you can be removed from the list at any time. But to continue as a list member, there is no need to take any action and in the next week or so you should received a ‘Welcome to the ‘Lives & Letters’ mailing list’ automated email. We would be grateful if you could publicise the new list as widely as possible among your colleagues and contacts. Many thanks!

Best wishes,
Liz Stanley and the OSLP Team

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14/09/11post
Olive Schreiner: Woman and Labour Centenary Special

Project news: The Olive Schreiner Letters Online website will be officially launched in January 2012. You can get a flavour of Schreiner’s letters from the monthly examples we post to the Project website. So far, we have posted examples of Schreiner’s letters from April, May, June, July, August and September 1911 around some of her key concerns: on ‘Oligarchic white men’ (April 1911); on the South African Women’s Enfranchisement League & 'race’ (May 1911); on the ‘black peril’ investigations (June 1911); on Will Schreiner and the Universal Races Congress, held in London in July 1911 (July 1911); on Will Schreiner not speaking at the Races Congress & on ‘the dreadful suffragette Con seen at close quarters (Aug 1911); and on women’s suffrage (Sep 1911).

In addition to this, we have just posted a set of letters around the publication of Schreiner’s influential Woman and Labour (1911) to commemorate its Centenary. Woman and Labour was described by Vera Brittain as the ‘bible of the women’s movement’ and it remained a key feminist text through to the 1960s. In it, Schreiner’s analysis of value and social labour anticipated recent feminist rethinking, with her letters providing remarkable insight into the completion, publication and reception of the book. There are many more such comments in the complete letters, which can be accessed when the Olive Schreiner Letters Online goes live in January 2012.

Best wishes,
Liz Stanley

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01/07/11post – Advance information about the 'Olive Schreiner Letters Online' Mailing List

SOME ADVANCE INFORMATION!
 
Towards the end of 2011, the Centre for Narrative and Auto/Biographical Studies (NABS) Mailing List will be superseded by an **updated mailing list** which will be attached to the brand new ‘Olive Schreiner Letters Online’ website. This site will be officially launched in January 2012. Through the updated mailing list, you will continue to receive information about narrative events as well as information about Schreiner’s letters and related research as before. This update will happen automatically, although as now you can of course be removed from the list at any time. There is no need to take any action whatsoever now, but we wanted to keep you in touch with future developments at an early stage.
 
As present, you can get a flavour of Schreiner’s letters from the monthly examples we post to the Project website. So far, we have posted examples of Schreiner’s letters from April, May and June 1911 around some of her key concerns: on ‘Oligarchic white men’ (April 1911); on the South African Women’s Enfranchisement League & 'race’ (May 1911); and on the ‘black peril’ investigations (June 1911). The link to a July 1911 letter in which Schreiner writes about the Universal Races Congress, held in London in July 1911, is now available! (July 1911)
 
Best wishes,
Liz Stanley

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09/06/11post
Keynote address on Schreiner by Liz Stanley at 'Gender & the politics of auto/biographical memory: new directions' Conference, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, Program L'homme congress, 10 June 2011

Project news: Liz Stanley is giving the keynote address at the 'Gender and the politics of auto/biographical memory: new directions' conference, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, Program L'homme congress, 10 June 2011. The title of her address is 'Against biographical closure: Olive Schreiner, A Returned South African, her letters, her essays, her fiction, her politics, her life'
. For more information, please follow this link to the Conference website.

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25/03/11post
– CONFERENCE PAPERS ON ASPECTS OF SCHREINER'S LETTERS!

Two papers, dealing with different aspects of Olive Schreiner's letters and life, are to be given at the NABS one-day conference on 'The Documents of Life Revisited', to be held at the University of Edinburgh on Friday 20 May, by Helen Dampier and Andrea Salter. The abstracts will be found below for your information. To be put on the NABS mailing list for this and other events, please email andrea.salter@ed.ac.uk - thank you.


Helen Dampier, Leeds Metropolitan University

Identifying the Quotidian in the Heterotopic Universe of Olive Schreiner’s Letters: “I am writing it in between, while I run into the kitchen every now & then to stir the ?lam ?brod & the sheep tail I am melting out on the stove; & now it is time to set the table for dinner”

 
In Documents of Life 2 (2001: 52), Plummer contends that letters are a “relatively rare document of life in the social sciences”, and suggests that this results from social scientists’ suspicions concerning their lack of direct referentiality. Letters’ reflection of the world of both writer and recipient, the complexities of time in and of letters, and what Plummer refers to as the ‘dross rate’ are all seen to compromise the referentiality of letters as documents of life.

Recognising that no written sources are unmediated or provide transparent access to the past, this paper argues in line with Plummer’s comments, that there is still a tendency to treat letters as directly referential and coterminous with ‘life itself’. It does so by examining the difficulties associated with gaining analytical purchase on the ‘quotidian’ in the letters of feminist writer and social theorist Olive Schreiner (1855-1920). It suggests that some of the ‘defining characteristics’ of letters – their ‘immediacy’, and what Stanley (2004: 208) refers to as their “flies in amber quality” – make it tempting to conflate the ‘quotidian of life’ and the ‘quotidian of letters’, with the latter having a by no means direct, one-on-one relationship with the former.

Instead letters can more usefully be understood by making use of Foucault’s (1967) notion of heterotopias, which he identities as times and spaces ‘outside’ of time and space. Deploying the concept of heterotopias helps to point up letters as textual constructions, and perceives letters as a universe of their own making, in which what is quotidian in the textual universe of the letters is the quotidian. Rather than conflating the quotidian with ‘the everyday’, this approach forces the researcher to confront the structural characteristics of Schreiner’s everyday letter-writing practices, and to revisit Plummer’s apposite insights about the mediated, artful nature of letters, as well as of documents of life more widely.


Andrea Salter, University of Edinburgh

‘Stories, or “someone telling something to someone about something”: two stories in Olive Schreiner’s letters & one in Nella Last’s Mass-Observation diary’

 
Stories are a common feature of everyday life, told in different situations for various purposes. Stories are also an essential part of ‘documents of life’, occurring in both letters and diaries among other forms of life-writing. My presentation focuses mainly on stories in letters, specifically those written by Olive Schreiner (1855-1920), feminist, socialist writer and social theorist, and which have emerged from Olive Schreiner Letters Project research. What a story ‘is’ is subject to various interpretations, making the task of identify them across c4800 extant Schreiner letters not altogether straight-forward. In addition, often the terms ‘narrative’ and ‘story’ are used interchangeably, while Michel de Certeau’s (1984) approach to understanding stories is helpful in providing a simple and practical framework for distinguishing stories. Firstly, my presentation will overview the broad structure of stories identified using de Certeau’s framework across Schreiner’s letters. Secondly, I will take two examples of rather different kinds of stories in Schreiner’s letters to point up some features of her ‘epistolary story-telling’ more generally. Thirdly, thinking about stories in terms of form suggests there are some important differences between telling stories in letters as compared to telling them in diaries, an idea based on my earlier research on the Mass Observation women’s diaries, in particular on Nella Last’s Mass-Observation diary, from which I draw an example. While some diarists are story-tellers and others are not, the stories that do appear in diaries are generally markedly less ‘to the person’ than those written in letters, and this raises the interesting possibility that a story should be examined as form-specific.

The quotation in the title is from: Richard Kearney (2002) On Stories London: Routledge, p.5. See also Michel de Certeau (1984) The Practice of Everyday Life London & California: University of California Press.

Abstracts & Programme

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22/02/11post
The Documents of Life Revisited! call for papers, NABS Seminar, Edinburgh, 20 May 2011

The Documents of Life Revisited!

A call for papers

A day-seminar to be held on Friday 20 May 2011, 10.00 - 4.30

Centre for Narrative & Auto/Biographical Studies, University of Edinburgh

"A major theme haunts this book. It is a longing for social science to take more seriously its humanistic foundations and to foster styles of thinking that encourage the creative, interpretive story telling of lives..." (_The Documents of Life 2_, p.1)

"A pragmatic critical humanism... 1. Embedded. 2. Symbolic, dialogic, inter-subjective selves. 3. Contingent. 4. Dually-embodied & symbolic. 5. Universal. With a moral (ethical, political) character."(_The Documents of Life 2_ pp.261-64)

The two editions of Ken Plummer's incredibly influential text, _The Documents of Life_ (1983) and _The Documents of Life 2_ (2001), have helped re-make the intellectual landscape and importantly contributed to the huge growth of biographical methods, auto/biographical approaches and narrative inquiry of the last 30 years. Topics dealt with by Plummer include:

  • The diversity of life stories
  • From written diaries & letters to video diaries & text etc
  • The auto/biographical society
  • Chicago & the method
  • Analysing life stories
  • Life histories as 'data'
  • Written life stories & audience
  • Life stories & the narrative turn
  • The human face -- reflexivity, power, ethics
  • Issues of truth, value & memory

A NABS Workshop is being held on Friday 20 May at the University of Edinburgh, from 10am to 4.30pm, on the theme of 'The Documents of Life Revisited'. As usual at NABS events, papers will be a mixture of 'usual' 30 minute presentations and shorter more focused ones of 15 minutes, with discussion slots attached to both.

A call is made for papers dealing with any aspect of 'the documents of life' -- biography, memoirs, autobiography, diaries, letters, postcards & postcard albums, photographs & photograph albums, painted portraits & 'lives', classics of 'documents of life' research (The Polish Peasant in Europe & America, Misch on autobiography, Chicago School & the Jack Roller.....). Papers offered can be theoretical, substantive, methodological, deal with ethical issues, and concern any of the key themes and questions raised by Plummer as well as by subsequent work in the field.

Offers of papers should be made by sending a title and an abstract of not more than 250 words to liz.stanley@ed.ac.uk <mailto:liz.stanley@ed.ac.uk>to be received by Monday 14 March at 9am please. Many thanks.

Liz Stanley
Director, Centre for Narrative & Auto/Biographical Studies, University of Edinburgh


--
Liz Stanley, Professor of Sociology&   Director of the Centre for Narrative&   Auto/Biographical Studies, University of Edinburgh, Chrystal Macmillan Building, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH8 9LD, UK. For the ESRC Olive Schreiner Letters Project, see www.oliveschreinerletters.ed.ac.uk also http://www.sps.ed.ac.uk/staff/sociology/stanley_liz

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15/02/11post
Helen Dampier & Liz Stanley have been invited to participate in the international workshop on
Gender Histories Across Epistemologies’.

Helen Dampier & Liz Stanley have been invited to participate in the international workshop on ‘Gender Histories Across Epistemologies’ organised by Mary Jo Maynes and Donna Gabaccia at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, in mid April. Their paper is entitled ‘I just express my views & leave them to work’: Using Olive Schreiner’s letters to re-think the historiography of Cape politics 1899-1910’. A draft version will be posted on the OSLP website with comment invited, nearer the date of the Workshop.


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28/09/10post – The Letters of Alice Greene, teacher, critic of the South African War, and letter-writer extraordinary                              (1858-1920) - Two books of interest to historians and sociologists, edited by John E. Barham

You can link to the book covers and further information about the 
publications here:

Alice Greene Letters.pdf

These two collections of letters edited by John Barham are fascinating 
on many levels. Alice Greene became a close friend of Olive Schreiner, 
and was a member of the illustrious Greene family (think Graham 
Greene, Hugh Greene...). The first collection centres around Greene's 
letters concerning relationship with her family and her life partner 
Betty Molteno as well as political matters concerning the war; the 
second concerns both sides of the correspondence with her younger 
sister-in-law Eva (John Barham's grandmother), resident in Brazil but 
of German extraction.


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21/07/10post  Olive Schreiner Letters Project - download publications!

Olive Schreiner Letters Project - download publications!

There have been recent developments to the Olive Schreiner Letters
Project website, and you might be interested in downloading publications
from it:

* Olive Schreiner’s books can with one exception be downloaded from
the website.
See: http://www.oliveschreinerletters.ed.ac.uk/AccessSchreinersBooks.html

* Project publications on letters, diaries and other life writings,
narrative analysis and more can be downloaded from the website.
See: http://www.oliveschreinerletters.ed.ac.uk/TeamPublications.html

* Working Papers on letterness and on letters and 'race' can be
downloaded from the website.
See: http://www.oliveschreinerletters.ed.ac.uk/WorkingPaperSeries.html


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28/04/10post –
NABS/SCDS: 'Exploring the Surfaces & Depths of Immigrant Personal Correspondence: What Did Kate                          Bond Want to Say?' A Workshop with Prof David Gerber,14 May 2010, University of Edinburgh

Scottish Centre for Diaspora Studies & Centre for NABS Joint Workshop

Dear Colleagues,

You are warmly invited to register for and attend a joint workshop hosted by the Scottish
Centre for Diaspora Studies and the Centre for Narrative & Auto/Biographical Studies on
'Exploring the Surfaces and Depths of Immigrant Personal Correspondence: What Did Kate
Bond Want to Say?'. Professor David Gerber, one of the world's authorities on migrant
correspondence, will lead the discussion. The details are attached and as follows:

Scottish Centre for Diaspora Studies
Centre for Narrative & Auto/Biographical Studies

Joint Workshop

'Exploring the Surfaces and Depths of Immigrant Personal Correspondence: What Did Kate
Bond Want to Say?'

Professor David Gerber
University of Buffalo

Friday 14 May 2010
4.00-6.00 pm

Seminar Room 5, Basement, Chrystal Macmillan Building, 15a George Square, Edinburgh

David Gerber is a one of the world's foremost authorities on migrant correspondence. His
many publications include Authors of their own lives: personal correspondence in the
lives of nineteenth century British immigrants to the United States (New York University
Press, 2006).

Places at this workshop are limited; to reserve a place, please contact Andrea Salter
(Andrea.Salter@ed.ac.uk) by Friday 7 May.

**All participants are asked to read in advance of the workshop, the Grayston-Bond letter
series in Charlotte Erickson, Invisible Immigrants: the adaptation of English and
Scottish immigrants in 19th-century America (1972)**.


With best wishes, Andrea

On behalf of the Scottish Centre for Diaspora Studies and the Centre
for Narrative & Auto/Biographical Studies

*Please circulate widely*

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26/01/10post – Edinburgh seminar on Migrant and Diaspora Narratives & Life Writings

‘Migrant and Diaspora Narratives & Life Writings’ Friday 26 March 12.30 - 5pm

Within the broad frame of the cultural and narrative turn, life writings have excited perhaps most interest with an array of fascinating theoretical as well as substantive work on all aspects of life writing and life representation more generally resulting. A new take on this is presently on the ascendant, stimulated by a renewed interest in migrancy and diaspora as conditions of life for many of the world’s people, whose agency is often expressed through the medium of life representations of different kinds.

A joint NABS and Scottish Centre for Diaspora Studies seminar will be held on Friday 26 March at the University of Edinburgh on the broad theme of ‘Migrant and diaspora life writings’. The seminar will run from 12.30 to 5pm. 

Centre for Narrative & Auto/Biographical Studies (NABS)
& Scottish Centre for Diaspora Studies
University of Edinburgh

‘Migrant and Diaspora Narratives & Life Writings’

Friday 26 March 2010 12.30 – 5pm

12.30 – 1.45            Welcome
Opening Paper
Enda Delaney ‘Archives of the mind: displacement and the historical imagination’
   
1.45 – 2.45              Shorter Papers Session I
Beatrix Gomez-Estern ‘Narratives of migration: the interweaving of personal & cultural identity…’
Margaret Ritchie ‘Female workers of the British herring industry…’
   
2.45 – 3.15              TEA AND COFFEE
   
3.15 – 4.15              Shorter Papers Session II
Sindi Gordon ‘Story-making within the African diaspora’
Mindaugas Zaleckas & Barry Gault ‘From the Baltic to Buchan: the stories of new migrants’
   
4.15 – 4.45              Closing Discussion: On David Gerber’s ‘Epistolary masquerades: acts of deceiving and withholding in
immigrant letters’ (pdf to be pre-circulated)
   
4.45 – 5.00              Any Other Business
   
If you haven’t already pre-booked a place, please can you email Dr Andrea Salter ASAP! Her email address is andrea.salter@ed.ac.uk

Abstracts

Opening Paper

‘Archives of the Mind: Displacement & the Historical Imagination’
Enda Delaney, University of Edinburgh

This paper explores how first-hand testimonies such as letters, autobiographies and oral histories can reconstruct what the American historian of religion, Robert Orsi, terms the ‘inner history’ of migration. This is a history that is centred on emotions, fears, expectations and the complexities of the lived experience. It is primarily a methodological examination of how such first-hand testimonies raise conceptual and interpretative questions about the sense of displacement that inevitably accompanied migration, and equally the limits to historical knowledge posed by using traditional documentary sources. In other words, it argues for more imaginative strategies to recover, analyse and interpret what are essentially the voices of the dispossessed, displaced and often powerless individuals who crossed the borders of nation states in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. These voices can take many forms and the challenge is to make sense of the myriad of stories, experiences and memories that are readily available. The case-study examined will be the Irish, one of the most heavily documented and frequently-studied global diasporas in the modern world. But the paper will hopefully raise questions of interest to many of those concerned with the broader historical study of migration and the interpretation of life writings.

Shorter Papers, Session I

‘Narratives of migration. The interweaving of personal & cultural identity through narrative’
Beatriz Macías Gómez-Estern, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Spain

This short paper will examine the role of narratives of migration as semiotic devices that interweave cultural and personal strands of identity construction. The data analysed come from a previous research project in which my colleague Manuel de la Mata Benítez and I comparatively analysed Andalusian migrants and non migrants’ arguments about their cultural identity displayed in a focus group tasks. In that study we found that migrants used mainly personal narratives as rhetoric tools. Here I shall focus on thematic and structural traits of these migrants’ narratives. The analysis illustrates that narratives of migration share some common features: homeland visualized as a ‘lost paradise’, the interlacing of personal and cultural identifications, involving high emotion, starting with a canonical state (living in the homeland) that is broken by the migration movement. The whole process is evaluated around a strong affiliation and commitment to the motherland. Narratives provide a privileged means of making sense of the turning-points faced in migration, and narratives of migration can be conceptualised as ‘self defining memories’.

‘Female workers of the British herring industry: contracted employees and economic tourists’
Margaret Ritchie, Independent Researcher

This paper discusses the experiences of the female workforces who took part in the annual migration of herring workers who travelled around Britain's coastlines and islands during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It will offer the opportunity for a comparison with the attitudes of observers and participants of the highly successful British herring curing industry, using newspaper correspondence and articles and both family and professional photographs.  Women in the herring curing business were the skilled contract workers of an industry which was a major contributor to the British economy and were the most highly paid workers in this sector. They worked in teams of three, on pre-season negotiated contracts with pay structures which included bonus systems and paid travel expenses. The influx of these workers in large numbers invigorated many local economies as well as creating temporary diasporic settlements. They were workforces who became popular subject matters for the flourishing photographic enthusiasts of that era and many of the myths concerning their working practices appear to have been supported by these visual records. I will present photographs from family collections and newspaper articles which offer a less romantic and more biographical representations of these female workforces. 

Shorter Papers, Session II

‘The Necessity of Story-Making within the African Diaspora and Migratory Community’
Sindi Gordon, Sussex University

My doctoral research explores how creative writing might be used to develop a ‘sense of self and identity’ amongst members of the African diaspora and migratory community. I am of Antiguan-Scottish parentage and grew up in one of the largest demographically migratory communities in the UK: ‘Highfields’, Leicester. I inherited the residue of displacement and consequently I spent the following fifteen years living and working across three continents as a documentary filmmaker and through the myriad of other people’s life stories I began to acknowledge my own search for a sense of place and congruence between my inner and outer worlds.  Returning to the UK and beginning a Masters in Creative Writing and Personal Development, the writing process allowed me to discover a wealth of stories stored deep inside me and I wrote for the first time of my Scottish mother, who died when I was fifteen and with her my connection to Scotland.  Being part of the African diaspora and migratory community accounted for the multifaceted nature of my existence, and this enabled me to connect to my own voice and placement. These ‘transformative’ experiences have all contributed to my research topic and chosen methodology of Participatory Action Research.  I am currently in the process of developing a writers’ workshop to be based in a hair salon that caters for African diaspora and migratory community members. The presentation will focus on creative writing as a means of exploring diasporic and migratory experiences and look at exactly what ‘Participatory Action Research’ entails.

From the Baltic to Buchan: A work in progress
Mindaugas Zaleckas and Barry Gault

“The dominant opinion is just a primitive stereotype about us; these people arrived here only to earn money and leave” (‘Julia’ from Lithuania, 2010)

We live and work in the Buchan area and are interested in finding a way of enabling the ‘new migrants’ to tell their stories. Our respondents are drawn from contacts made through the Migrant Workers Association and other community groups. Our methodology has its roots in grounded theory insofar as it is our aspiration that categories of meaning should emerge from the responses of migrants themselves. However we recognise that the perspectives of the respective researchers have emerged from differing cultures and notions about the nature of migration. Within our method of working, it is vitally important that dialogue concerning the way we gather the stories, and the construction that we put on those stories, is explicitly recorded. In recognising and outlining this dialogue we hope that our own biases within the theorising process will become apparent. The semi structured interview we deploy takes the respondent through their migration journey and asks about such things as motivation and the manner in which their migration was facilitated. They are asked about their present experience of life in Scotland with regard to such issues of employment, leisure activities, religious practice and contact with Scottish and ‘home’ culture. Future aspirations with regard to ‘return’ or further migration are also covered. Interviewing the first few respondents led us to consider asking selected respondents to pen a short fictional story, in a language of their choice, about the experience of migration. The interviews were taped and the initial idea was to transcribe and translate them, and then embark on the process of first level abstraction. However in the process of actually conducting the interviews it was found to be more productive to ask a question in the preferred language, and for the multi lingual researcher to convey the answer in English to the mono lingual researcher. This gave an opportunity for the respondent, who usually has some level of facility in English, to correct or modify the answer. It also gives the researchers the opportunity to pose ‘following the thread’ questions. The ‘dialogue’ continues within a few days in an ‘initial processing meeting’ between us as the two researchers, where our respective records and recollections of the interview are compared. Clearly an important issue which impinges on this dialogue is the nature of the translation process itself, where the multi lingual researcher has to keep a balance between what is actually said and conveying the meaning of what has been said. What we hope is a creative tension consequently exists between the stories of the recent migrants and the researchers’ stories.
             
Closing Discussion

Closing discussion on David Gerber’s ‘Epistolary masquerades: acts of deceiving and withholding in immigrant letters’ in (eds) S. Bruce et al Letters Across Borders: The Epistolary Practices of International Migrants Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

 (A pdf of this and some possible questions for the discussion will be pre-circulated.)

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12/12/09post – Working Papers Launch


CALL FOR PAPERS! New Working Paper series - Letters, Letterness and Epistolary Networks

The ESRC Olive Schreiner Letters Project, based at the Universities of Edinburgh, Leeds Metropolitan and Sheffield, is pleased to announce the launch of its new Working Paper series on 'Letters, Letterness and Epistolary Networks', and to call for papers from people writing about any aspect of the theoretical, methodological and substantive aspects of the epistolary form and epistolary practice.

Some of the areas of the scholarly engagement with 'the letter' which the Working Papers series is interested in publishing on include, but are not confined to:
  • The complexities and porous boundaries of 'letterness' and its interface with other forms or genres
  • Epistolary networks and exchanges of letters and other epistolary forms (postcards, emails, text) within them
  • 'Fictionalising' and 'factionalising in exchanges of letters
  • New developments in or declines of letter-writing and exchanging
  • Visual, oral and other renegade kinds of 'letters'
  • Letters in fiction and film
  • Public letters, private letters and those in between
  • Pre- 'writing paper & postal system' forms of epistolarity
  • Letter-exchanges over time and patterns of social change
The Working Papers on 'Letters, Letterness and Epistolary Networks' will be refereed in the usual manner. At the same time, the Working Papers are not intended as a replacement for or an alternative to publication in monographs, journal articles and book chapters, but instead as a means of publishing work which, for reasons of length and treatment, would not easily find a home in such publishing outlets.

The Working Papers series is an electronic on-line one which will showcase quality
academic scholarly work -
  • which is concerned with letterness, with the nature of 'the letter', with the character of epistolarity, and with any aspect of epistolary networks,
  • which is developed at too great a length to find an outlet in an 8,000 word journal
  • article or book chapter, but too short for a 80,000 word specialist monograph, which utilises source materials such as jpegs of documents, photographs, and oral data,
  • which are not easy amenable to publication in conventional print form
What you will get as an LLEN Working Paper author:
  • Work on letters and letterness which is developed at too great a length for a journal article, or which utilises visual, oral and other material that will not easily find a home in a print context, and it is of sufficient quality for publication, will find a publishing outlet in the series.
  • The Working Papers will be refereed and of a high quality, and the series is located in the context of a major ESRC-funded project, the Olive Schreiner Letters Project (RES-062-23-1286).
  •  Papers published in the Working Paper series will have an ISSN number, date of publication, cover and all the usual apparatus surrounding publication.
  • After refereeing, accepted papers will receive rapid publication in PDF format , and a small number of print copies will also be provided.
  • The Olive Schreiner Letters Project is picked up by all the major search engines and work published in the series will achieve a high number of readers.
How to find out more: Send an email with the title and abstract of your proposed paper, including information about its length and what kind of epistolary data or other materials it utilises, to Liz Stanley  liz.stanley@ed.ac.uk or Helen Dampier H.Dampier@leedsmet.ac.uk who will be pleased to discuss with you in a provisional way its suitability for the series. Once papers are submitted, they will go through a refereeing process of the usual kind.

Liz Stanley & Helen Dampier, December 2009

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01/11/09post – Mellon Fellowship for Project PI


Liz Stanley has been awarded an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fellowship to work on Olive Schreiner’s manuscripts and letters in the collections of the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas, Austin. The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fellowships are highly competitive and it is an acknowledgement of the importance of the Olive Schreiner Letter Project and its activities for Liz to have been awarded one. Liz takes up the Fellowship on 8 November 2008. 

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© Copyright of the Olive Schreiner Letters Project and the ESRC, 2008. All rights reserved. Photograph of Olive Schreiner courtesy of the National Library of South Africa. INIL 3181 1895. These pages were designed, built and are maintained by Andrea Salter; last updated April 2015. Contact the OSLP

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